• Online-only

    Police across Canada test out military equipment at private supplier ‘range day’

    Experts say rising police militarization is a consequence of mixing police and military vendors at equipment expos

  • Magazine

    “Defund the police” means “defund the police”

    It’s a demand that’s easy to understand and easy to fight for, which is important because we’ll need a lot of people to help us win it.

  • Online-only

    It’s time to talk about police in our unions

    Toward an abolitionist approach to decent work for all

  • Magazine

    Will it help us fight?

    Briarpatch began 49 years ago as a four-page newsletter produced by and for low-income earners, welfare recipients, and the unemployed. Today, as so many of my friends lose their jobs or have their shifts halved during the COVID-19 pandemic, I can see clearly the thread that connects Briarpatch to its origins half a century ago.

  • Online-only

    COVID-19 and the threat of “community policing”

    Across the country, governments are giving police heightened powers during the pandemic. But as I’ve seen in my home of Kitchener-Waterloo, when police embed themselves in poor and racialized communities, they may simply decide not to leave.

  • Online-only

    Free transit is just the beginning

    It’s no coincidence that struggles over public transit are erupting across the Americas. Free transit is about an end to austerity, a refusal of police power, and a demand for decommodified and universal public services.

  • Sask Dispatch

    Regina’s 92-million-dollar problem

    A crisis of underfunded social programs leads to an increased crime rate, which is used to justify ballooning police budgets. Activists are making the case for defunding the police.

  • Magazine

    Reading truth to power

    The struggle over whom Winnipeg’s downtown library belongs to serves as an unexpectedly sophisticated example of what’s possible when leftists organize outside of the electoral sphere and commit to winning a single protracted struggle.

  • Magazine

    “Pacifying the unruly city”

    Official laws and social norms are wielded as tools of control to preserve urban parks as spaces for middle-class white settlers. Jessica DeWitt reviews On this Patch of Grass: City Parks on Occupied Land by Matt Hern, Selena Couture, Daisy Couture, and Sadie Couture.

  • Magazine

    Fatal encounters

    Cops may kill fewer people in Canada than in the U.S., but it’s clear that the same racism and lack of accountability underpins police shootings as in the U.S. The only difference is that, in Canada, it’s accompanied by less transparency and a paucity of data.

  • Magazine

    Distinct histories, shared solidarity

    Black and Indigenous people cannot look to the state for protection or systemic change. Instead, our movements have to recognize the differences between our oppressions, and stand beside each other while building new, shared spaces to exist.

  • Magazine

    Unsettling the Orchard

    We hear it all the time: racist police officers are “bad apples” – exceptions to the rule. What kind of change can the conversation provoke when we start talking about the orchard, rather than the apples?

  • Online-only

    Indict the System: Indigenous & Black Resistance

    The correct emotional response to state violence targeting Indigenous and Black families is rage.