• Magazine

    The myth of Canadian generosity

    When Canada boasted about its foreign aid while repeatedly blocking a proposal to waive the intellectual property rights to the COVID vaccines, it revealed a 150-year-old pattern of empty generosity.

  • Magazine

    The ‘60s Scoop and everyday acts of elimination

    In her new book, Allyson Stevenson studies Saskatchewan’s child apprehension program at “the heart of Canada’s colonial enterprise.”

  • Magazine

    The House of Windsor must fall

    But not before they pay reparations to the descendants of the victims of the transatlantic trade in Africans.

  • Magazine

    The slow crisis in Saskatchewan’s long-term care

    Though 80 per cent of Canada’s COVID deaths have happened in long-term care homes, Saskatchewan has fared better than the Canadian average. It was thanks, in part, to its relatively robust system of publicly owned homes. But in recent decades, cracks have begun showing in that system.

  • Magazine

    The strike-breakers’ playbook

    For over 30 years, Canadian employers have turned to a private security firm called AFIMAC to help surveil picket lines, provide scab labour, and break strikes.

  • Magazine

    Ingesting surveillance

    A new digital pill that tracks whether it has been ingested is poised to enter the Canadian market. But for people who are incarcerated and medicated, it threatens to expand surveillance both inside and outside prisons.

  • Magazine

    What is a migrant? And is she a revolutionary?

    Migrants are now a central part of the local working class in virtually every town and city. Organizing against capitalism involves treating migrants not as objects of charity, but as revolutionary subjects.

  • Magazine

    Money rock

    Under the peatland and permafrost of northern Ontario lies some $60–$120 billion worth of copper, nickel, and chromite. The Ontario government is hell-bent on passing the Far North Act and mining the so-called Ring of Fire, but the Anishinaabayg have a sacred responsibility to protect the land, and with it, their language.

  • Magazine

    Facing loss honestly

    Defeat happens all the time in leftist campaigns, but very few leftists (including leftist media) have developed honest, helpful ways of talking about it.

  • Online-only

    Against all nationalisms

    Nandita Sharma responds to Phil Henderson’s review of her new book, “Home Rule.” She argues that instead of providing us with freedom and justice, national liberation struggles have delivered us to capital and to sovereign power. As a result, rejecting nationalism – all nationalisms, including indigenous nationalisms “from below” – is critical to anti-colonial struggle.

  • Magazine

    Uncontainable

    How do we build a transformative mass movement against pandemic-era injustice?

  • Online-only

    International solidarity won’t be “cancelled”

    When right-wing media takes aim at Dr. Norman Bethune, it’s part of a resurgent red scare in Canada. Amid rising Canada-China tensions, Bethune shows us a model of working-class solidarity with Chinese people.

  • Online-only

    PLEASE LISTEN

    “I fear the moment when the listener decides that I am incorrect, uninformed, or too self-interested to be speaking truthfully.” A photo essay about the fear of being silenced.

  • Online-only

    Clock me like one of your French girls

    I’ve never seen myself. I still don’t, only a peripheral glimpse: of potential, of hope, of becoming, of future.

  • Online-only

    a simile is more honest than a metaphor thank you no questions at this time

    suffering isn’t bravery those two things are different let someone / say it. to absorb an injustice because you need to to survive’s / not courage don’t let them say that.

  • Magazine

    Spirits

    Deeper than oceans, channels twice removed / from their native basins. This blood is thicker / than the St. Lawrence, quicker / than the Demerara, sicker / than the Ganges.

  • Magazine

    Finding kin and connection through “Halfbreed”

    This year, I read Maria Campbell’s foundational memoir in a book club of Métis women. Nearly 50 years since it was published, “Halfbreed” still holds important teachings for those of us on the journey of understanding what it means to be Métis.

  • Magazine

    Land Back beyond borders

    What does it mean for Indigenous people to be good guests on each other’s land?

  • Magazine

    China, the Canadian left, and countering state capitalist apologia

    Amid escalating tensions between the U.S. and Chinese governments, a troubling campist discourse has been growing in the Canadian left. Socialists should side with neither the American nor the Chinese state – instead, we need to build internationalism from below.

  • Magazine

    Baby book: Documenting undocumented motherhood

    An undocumented mother’s baby book for her son chronicles the experience of pregnancy, birth, and motherhood without immigration status in Canada.