• Magazine

    Cracking the soil in Uganda

    How will subsistence farmers like Ninsiima Florence fare under the G8’s New Alliance for Food Security and Nutrition?

  • Magazine

    Courting collaboration

    Pinehouse residents Fred Pederson, John Smerek, and Dale Smith all feel like they have been wearing targets on their backs since their names appeared in a lawsuit filed in June.

  • Magazine

    A voice for the grasslands

    Grasslands ecosystems are under threat globally. With less than 20 per cent of Saskatchewan’s prairie lands remaining, the provincial and federal governments are attempting to privatize the public pastures established in the 1930s by the Prairie Farm Rehabilitation Administration (PFRA). Ex-oil-industry contractor and inveterate grasslands lover Laura Stewart is our personal guide through a vibrant ecosystem, revealing the global, and colonial, stakes of grasslands health – and the growing movement rising to its defence.

  • Magazine

    A sacred journey for future generations

    The Stanley Mission walkers are trekking from northern Saskatchewan to Parliament Hill to defend lands and waterways against the Conservative government’s assault on the environment and the rights of Indigenous people.

  • Magazine

    Organizing for Gaza’s land and sea

    Gaza’s farmers and fishers are on the front lines of a military occupation intended to force them from their land and seaways. The Union of Agricultural Work Committees is organizing Palestinian farmers and fishers to support their efforts to remain on the land and sustain an independent agricultural economy. With the help of a growing international boycott against Israel, their strength is growing.

  • Magazine

    Innu not idle as Plan Nord advances

    As Pauline Marois’ Parti Québécois tries to repackage the Charest government’s neoliberal policies, resistance to the massive Plan Nord project is escalating among the northern Innu people and their allies. Even as band councils enter negotiations with the Canadian government, grassroots activists inspired by Idle No More are fighting for Indigenous autonomy and their traditional territories.

  • Magazine

    No force more powerful

    Nothing can really convey the power of moments where people come together to realize their collective strength, but we thought we’d try anyway

  • Magazine

    Voices of resistance

    Across the Americas, Indigenous women are working to restore values of harmony, co-operation, balance, and respect within their communities.

  • Magazine

    Conversations on ecological justice, healing, and decolonization

    If those of us who care about the earth are to have a chance at actually stopping its destruction, we need to expand environmentalism way beyond its conventional boundaries.

  • Magazine

    Monkeywrench murder mystery

    The Slickrock Paradox, by Alberta-based mystery author Stephen Legault, wraps its twisting plot around one central mystery. There are crimes for the protagonist to solve, including more than one murder, but they are almost peripheral; the core riddle is the absence of a body.

  • Magazine

    Trespassers on their own land?

    Economic development based on resource extraction and other high- impact activities continues at the expense of traditional Indigenous land-based economies. While military, oil and gas, and uranium industry development in traditional Dene, Cree, and Métis territories offers some wage labour, it displaces traditional labour such as hunting, trapping, fishing, and gathering.

  • Magazine

    The spoils of an undeclared war

    The presence of drug traffickers in Laguna del Tigre hasn’t affected oil production. In fact, there’s a renewed interest from oil companies in Guatemala’s oil.

  • Magazine

    Boiling point

    The lack of safe drinking water in First Nations communities is just one example of the long-standing underfunding and neglect that has led to the substandard living conditions that plague First Nations communities across Canada.

  • Magazine

    Fractured land

    The first question asked when the issue of fracking on Kainai territory is presented to new ears is often, “How could this happen?” It is a difficult question to answer, but there are four major players: the gas and oil companies; government, both provincial and federal; the Blood Tribe chief and council; and the Blood Tribe member population.

  • Magazine

    Awaiting justice

    For three decades, the traditional territory of the Lubicon Cree in northern Alberta has undergone massive oil and gas development without the consent of the Lubicon people and without recognition of our Aboriginal rights.

  • Magazine

    Flooded and forgotten

    Around much of northern Manitoba, “hydro” is a dirty word, and for good reason. These projects have reconfigured the landscape of the entire region, drying whole rivers and engorging lakes.

  • Magazine

    Stepping up for future generations

    In summer 2011, several people from communities in northern Saskatchewan walked 820 kilometres from Pinehouse to Regina to raise awareness about the storage and transportation of nuclear waste in the province, and to oppose a proposed nuclear waste dump near Pinehouse. This is an excerpt from their radio interview with Don Kossick following the walk.

  • Magazine

    Canadian mining on trial

    As a court battle ensues between the Salvadoran government and Canadian mining company Pacific Rim, the disappearances and murders of anti-mining activists are a tangible manifestation of the lack of respect for individual and collective rights in the face of highly lucrative development projects.

  • Magazine

    The next generation of land defenders

    Meet the youth at the heart of a movement to raise awareness about a proposed nuclear waste dump near their communities. These five young people participated in an 820-kilometre walk from Pinehouse to Regina, Saskatchewan to oppose the storage and transportation of nuclear waste in the province.

  • Magazine

    The colour of food

    Farm workers and their unions have always been at the forefront of the battle to reduce the toxic pesticides served on our fruits and vegetables, fighting for environmental food standards before most consumers were aware of the concept of organic food. Yet today, many food activists seem concerned solely about directly supporting their local farmer, with farm workers’ conditions absent from the seasonal garden tour map.