• Magazine

    Journalism with movements in the South

    When journalists insist the world’s problems, no matter how big or small, are caused by U.S. government interference, grassroots struggles against austerity and authoritarianism fall out of view.

  • Four pieces of media against a blue background: a book cover for Indigenous Media Arts in Canada, a movie poster for Writing With Fire, a movie poster for Tell The Truth And Run, and a book cover for the Community Radio Toolkit.
    Magazine

    A reading list on alternative and grassroots media

    Alternative media’s promise is that all people have a right to participate in making media, free of commercial and government control. These are a few of the guiding voices on how to build media for people, not profit.

  • A digital collage showing an underwater ecosystem. Fish swim near fish-shared lures with Google logos for eyes. At the top, a dragnet made of interlocking Meta logos looms over the fish.
    Magazine

    The dangers of Big Tech funding journalism

    Google and Meta are spending millions on programs and awards to help news outlets in crisis. What’s at stake when tech giants are allowed to brand themselves as the saviours of an industry they helped destroy?

  • An illustration of a person with six arms. They have brown skin and black locs. With their many arms, they are frantically sipping an energy drink, typing on a laptop, holding a cell phone to their ear, waving a newspaper, and holding a
    Magazine

    Independent media’s bad labour problem

    From union-busting to systemic racism, when bad labour practices have embedded themselves in the very publications trying to write into existence a more just world, what is to be done?

  • An illustration from the perspective of a person working at a laptop. Looming over their laptop screen is a wide man in a suit and Canadian flag brooch, his hands grabbing the laptop screen. Beside the laptop is a sticky note that says
    Magazine

    Doing anti-imperialist journalism while the world marches to war

    After Russia invaded Ukraine, anything other than support for sending unlimited weapons to Ukraine was painted as pro-Russian propaganda. What does anti-war journalism look like in a climate of social media harassment and state attacks?

  • A digital illustration of a ship (similar to the one on the New Brunswick Flag) sailing on an inky purple sea against a yellow sky. The sail on the ship is a newspaper copy of the NB Media Co-op.
    Magazine

    “Don’t hate the media, be the media”

    How New Brunswick’s Media Co-op is standing up to the Irvings’ corporate power

  • A collage of magazine clippings from New Breed, showing Métis people cooking, meeting, and protesting, along with headlines like
    Magazine

    Métis militancy and Saskatchewan media

    In the ’70s and ’80s, Saskatchewan’s left was chronicled by two formidable magazines: New Breed and Briarpatch. This is the story of how they made grassroots media in Saskatchewan.

  • The covers of four archival issues of Briarpatch, against a light blue background
    Magazine

    50 years of editing Briarpatch

    Four editors reflect on decades of editing Briarpatch: what they learned, the stories that challenged them, what’s changed, and what’s stayed the same.

  • A photo of copies of Briarpatch from 2009 strewn across a wooden table. The cover of the topmost issue shows a police in riot gear looming behind a woman, with the words
    Magazine

    File rejected

    In 2009, Briarpatch’s $33,000 application to the Canada Magazine Fund was rejected, without explanation, by Stephen Harper’s Minister of Canadian Heritage. It would take an access to information request to reveal that, behind the scenes, the fund’s staff were also being stonewalled by the minister’s office. 

  • A copy of Briarpatch laying on a pink background. On the cover, it shows a cartoon-like illustration of a house with an orange roof, and a a big pink tree. In front of it is a cluster of people, representing different members of the Briarpatch community: someone wearing a sasquatch costume, people holding cameras, ice skates, a baby, a receipt, and a stack of magazines. On the cover it reads
    Magazine

    Happy 50th birthday, Briarpatch

    This issue tells the story of Briarpatch’s survival, and explores how to build better media in Canada.

  • A photo taken from bird's-eye view. In the center, copies of an alt-weekly newspaper called The Grind are fanned out. The cover of The Grind shows a person standing in a subway station and the words
    Magazine

    The case for large-scale workers’ media in Canada

    Unions, union members, and people with access to wealth need to think big about shifting the media landscape in Canada.

  • Online-only

    Where there’s smoke, there’s no fire

    New Freedom of Information documents show the City of Toronto’s efforts to control the media narrative around encampment evictions last summer – inflating the number of fires in encampments and using media exclusion zones.

  • Online-only

    No more pandemic platitudes

    In her new COVID How-Not-To manual, Nora Loreto takes a month-by-month look at the first year of the pandemic – and the pro-business politicians and docile press that led to its mismanagement.

  • Magazine

    Research for transforming the world

    An interview with Chris Dixon on doing research with social movements.

  • Magazine

    On creativity and commerce

    How do we avoid a world in which human creativity and knowledge becomes just another occasion for commerce?

  • Magazine

    The HuffPost Canada union is dead. Long live the HuffPost Canada union.

    My newsroom unionized. We were shut down two weeks later. Here’s why it was still worth it.

  • Magazine

    Tough conversations about Canada’s labour movement

    Where can we speak honestly about the weaknesses of the labour movement, offering constructive criticism and debating paths forward, without making the movement vulnerable to bad-faith attacks by neoliberal columnists and far-right ghouls? 

  • The Sask Dispatch is looking for solutions journalism stories

    We’re looking for stories about the practical solutions Saskatchewan people are building in response to social and environmental issues. Pitches are due May 9, 2021.

  • Online-only

    International solidarity won’t be “cancelled”

    When right-wing media takes aim at Dr. Norman Bethune, it’s part of a resurgent red scare in Canada. Amid rising Canada-China tensions, Bethune shows us a model of working-class solidarity with Chinese people.

  • Online-only

    Why a progressive buyer should go for Torstar

    The second-largest chain of newspapers in Canada is about to be bought by a couple Conservative-donor businessmen. It’s time for progressive groups and individuals to make a bid for Torstar.