• Blog

    All the ways that Canadian journalists serve the ruling class

    Over the last few years, ostensibly neutral Canadian journalists have eagerly stepped up to bat for fascist presidents, far-right blogs, and spy organizations.

  • Sask Dispatch

    Introducing the Sask Dispatch

    We’re trying out a low-cost, low-risk way to produce and publish more journalism about Saskatchewan.

  • Magazine

    We Interrupt This Program

    A new book explores Indigenous interventions into settler media, combining acceptance with refusal. Greg Macdougall reviews We Interrupt This Program by Miranda Brady and John Kelly.

  • Blog

    Canada’s right-wing rage machine vs. Nora Loreto

    Tracking the work of a loosely coordinated right-wing network that spurred on an enormous public reaction

  • Magazine

    The Anti-Somali Feedback Loop

    The feedback loop between harmful media representation and legislation has imposed a massive burden on Somalis who arrived in Canada to escape war. For 30 years, it has impacted employment prospects, access to education and housing, and the freedom to swiftly rebuild lives.

  • Magazine

    Toward a New Common Sense

    To build the political left we must help to reshape the assumptions people have about the world.

  • Magazine

    Art and identity

    Montreal-based Iraqi-Canadian artist Sundus Abdul Hadi discusses art and identity in the context of the Iraq War and Arab diaspora.

  • Magazine

    Letter from the editor

    Briarpatch has always been a labour of love, the key to its unlikely success, as past editor Dave Mitchell notes. “It consistently leads with the heart, and so it’s able to produce quality journalism with a tragic fraction of the masthead depth of most publications.”

  • Magazine

    Dear Briarpatch

    The following poem was pieced together from snippets of letters to the editor of Briarpatch’s 40-year history. Each line is a direct, unedited quote from a Briarpatch reader, with the voices of dozens of readers represented in the whole poem.

  • Magazine

    Reflections on 40 years of scraping by and thriving

    Briarpatch has always been a labour of love, and I believe that’s the key reason for the magazine’s unlikely success.”

  • Magazine

    Briar Index

    Number of Facebook fans in Pakistan: 85

  • Magazine

    Briarpatch in photos

    From curling bonspiels to baseball tournaments and fundraising dinners, we present a series of photos from the Briarpatch archives.

  • Magazine

    Blaming Mr. Brierley

    The first issue was photocopied in March or April 1971 at the Saskatoon Family Service Bureau (where I was working at the time) on one of the early machines that used rolls of that grey, waxy paper.

  • Magazine

    40 years of Briarpatch

    There are two schools of thought. One is that government should be neutral and provide funds for magazines. The other is that if you’re reliant on government for funding, chances are that you’ll back off from criticism, which we never did, and we paid the price.

  • Magazine

    Letter from the editor

    It was a brisk sunny day in November 2007 when I first bounded up the stairs at Huston House, the historic building in which Briarpatch makes its home, brimming with energy and ideas.

  • Magazine

    Hierarchies of worthiness

    In news coverage of violence, women are almost always portrayed as victims. Whether they are worthy, innocent victims in need of rescue (“virgins”), as in the case of Afghan women post-9/11, or unworthy, culpable victims to be ignored or incarcerated (“vamps”), as with Indigenous women in Canada, depends on their strategic value to the forces in power.

  • Magazine

    Sanitizing Pride

    With Toronto’s 31st annual Pride Parade fast approaching, the legacy of last year’s controversial attempted banning of the group Queers Against Israeli Apartheid from the Parade continues to resonate today.

  • Magazine

    Empire of illusion

    The theme of Pulitzer Prize-winning author Chris Hedges’ new book is pretty straight­forward: no matter how you look at it, we’re hooped. “Our way of life is over” Hedges writes. “Our profligate consumption is finished. The good news, however, is that he looks at these desolate prospects from some awfully interesting perspectives, even if he is a bit short on solutions.

  • Magazine

    Blanket condemnations

    The burqa, chador or niqab (henceforth used interchangeably), a loose-fitting robe worn by some Muslim women that covers the body from head to toe, is one of the most powerful symbols of women’s subjugation under Islam. This garb is often presented as an existential threat to the West, capable of destabilizing the very foundations of our liberal democracies.

  • Magazine

    Will write for food

    It’s an unremarkable Tuesday evening in mid-October and I’ve just entered a second-floor meeting room at the Northern District Library in downtown Toronto. I’m feeling optimistic.