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  • Magazine

    Anything but empty

    Terra nullius is a lie. The Prairies have never been empty – they’ve always been teeming with anti-capitalist and anti-colonial resistance.

  • Magazine

    Chilling public protest

    Strategic Lawsuits Against Public Participation (SLAPPs) are used to silence, impoverish, and intimidate protesters. Now, with a lawsuit filed against the alleged participants of Winnipeg’s Rooster Town Blockade, we may be seeing one of the first SLAPPs on the Prairies.

  • Magazine

    Colonial courts and settler justice

    Most days during Gerald Stanley’s trial, the courtroom could be cut in half: the white half – family and supporters of the accused – and the brown half – family and supporters of the victim.

  • Blog

    Who will publish eulogies for the victims of Barrick Gold?

    On Peter Munk’s dark legacy

  • Blog

    Camped out for Justice

    Colten Boushie. Tina Fontaine. Countless others. “Something’s gotta change. Something more than fake promises and words.”

  • Magazine

    Silencing Opposition of the Site C Dam

    Protesters of the Site C dam in the Peace River Valley are facing a civil suit from both BC Hydro and the B.C. government.

  • Magazine

    INSURGENCE/RESURGENCE at the Winnipeg Art Gallery

    The largest contemporary Indigenous art exhibition in the Winnipeg Art Gallery’s history, INSURGENCE/RESURGENCE is framed as an act of rebellion and a revitalization of Indigenous culture that challenges dominant Western methods of artmaking and presentation.

  • Blog

    We can’t talk about reconciliation while we’re still justifying killing Indigenous people

    Colten Boushie’s killing and Gerald Stanley’s acquittal make it clear: justice has nothing to do with lip service, and everything to do with tangible action.

  • Magazine

    Racism, death, and hard truths in a northern city

    In her new book, Seven Fallen Feathers, journalist Tanya Talaga delves into the stories of seven Indigenous students in Thunder Bay whose lives were cut short.

  • Magazine

    Cannibal 150: Exposing the Canadian Windigo

    Indigenous peoples have been battling Windigo – a haunting, cannibalistic beast – for far longer than 150 years. Windigo is at the core of the Canadian government and society, and the best defence against it is Indigenous resurgence.

  • Blog

    Why We Can’t Have Nice Things

    The Saskatchewan government has circumvented the decision of the Northern teacher education program.

  • Magazine

    The New Threat Threshold

    What Project SITKA reveals about the basis of pernicious surveillance of Indigenous activists

  • Magazine

    Joint Statement on the Criminalization of Journalist Justin Brake

    As editors, publishers, and journalists working in independent media, we condemn the criminalization of Indigenous land protectors and journalist Justin Brake.

  • Magazine

    Accumulation by Dispossession

    Corporations are after the resource-rich land – not sustainable, fair employment.

  • Magazine

    The Indigenous Nurses Who Decolonized Health Care

    Few Indigenous labour history studies, especially in the post-fur trade era, focus on Indigenous women’s work, but labour functioned as a colonial tool to strip Indigenous people of title and status. Indigenous women faced the worst moral and social regulation, racism, and sexism at work, and so Indigenous women’s labour became a site of resistance to patriarchy, colonialism, and capitalism. The history of Indigenous nurses’ organizing was especially revolutionary.

  • Magazine

    Land and the Food that Grows On It

    Out of a history of colonial food weaponization emerges a thriving movement of Indigenous food sovereignty.

  • Blog

    Interview with Colonialism No More - Regina Solidarity Camp

    Three weeks into setting up a solidarity camp at the INAC office, activists in Regina are standing strong for Indigenous youth.

  • Magazine

    A legacy of Canadian child care

    What was it like to be caught in the Sixties Scoop, when thousands of Indigenous children were taken from their families and placed in settler households?