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  • Magazine

    “Pacifying the unruly city”

    Official laws and social norms are wielded as tools of control to preserve urban parks as spaces for middle-class white settlers. Jessica DeWitt reviews On this Patch of Grass: City Parks on Occupied Land by Matt Hern, Selena Couture, Daisy Couture, and Sadie Couture.

  • Magazine

    “Indigenizing” child apprehension

    In Ontario’s Indigenous child welfare agencies, the superficial trappings of culture take the place of policies that would grant jurisdiction over Indigenous children to Indigenous families, individuals, and communities.

  • Magazine

    Sending Josephine home

    Josephine Pelletier was shot to death by Calgary police in May. Her life and death shed light on the complicated interplay between colonialism, incarceration, and police brutality. This is her story.

  • Magazine

    A broad vision for reproductive justice

    Thirty years after the Morgentaler decision, reproductive rights fall short of full reproductive justice – including the freedom to have and raise children in safe and healthy communities.

  • Magazine

    Racism, death, and hard truths in a northern city

    In her new book, Seven Fallen Feathers, journalist Tanya Talaga delves into the stories of seven Indigenous students in Thunder Bay whose lives were cut short.

  • Magazine

    Defying the War on Drugs

    Harm reduction workers are building the infrastructure to respond to the opioid crisis.

  • Magazine

    Cannibal 150: Exposing the Canadian Windigo

    Indigenous peoples have been battling Windigo – a haunting, cannibalistic beast – for far longer than 150 years. Windigo is at the core of the Canadian government and society, and the best defence against it is Indigenous resurgence.

  • Magazine

    Canada 150 Opposed in Katarokwi

    Idle No More–Kingston/Katarokwi is building momentum against the celebrations around John A. Macdonald and Canada 150.

  • Magazine

    Land and the Food that Grows On It

    Out of a history of colonial food weaponization emerges a thriving movement of Indigenous food sovereignty.

  • Magazine

    Dying from Improvement: Inquests and Inquiries into Indigenous Deaths in Custody

    How does the settler state use the legal apparatus of inquests to justify colonialism?

  • Magazine

    Against the Pipeline Prerogative

    The National Energy Board is the regulatory body that determines whether (and which) pipelines will pump bitumen across Canada. As an extension of a colonial project that violates Indigenous land and consent, the NEB is up against Indigenous women and their allies leading the fight against pipelines.

  • Magazine

    Living Death

    Winner of the 2016 Writing in the Margins Contest for creative non-fiction.

  • Magazine

    White Woman’s Burden

    Excerpt from Beyond the Pale: White Women, Racism and History, published by Verso in 1992, 2015.

  • Magazine

    Making a Living on the Trapline

    With the support of a new government program, trappers are reviving the traditional economy in the Northwest Territories.

  • Blog

    Food Crisis in Nunavut Prompts Call to Action on January 31

    A call to action from Feeding My Family.

  • Blog

    Locked Arms & Open Hearts (For Ayotzinapa)

    Students from the Okanagan Valley mobilize for Ayotzinapa

  • Magazine

    Hijacked canoes and settler ships

    Is Indigenous land reclamation a form of environmentalism? How does Indigenous resurgence relate to left-wing political traditions?