• Magazine

    Rumour has it

    Anti-gossip policies, like other ostensibly good policies, are wielded by management to keep workers from building solidarity and transforming their workplaces.

  • Magazine

    Against a culture of paid activism

    As the logic of capitalism infiltrates our social movements, we must choose between being paid for our activism and building a strong culture of social struggle.

  • Magazine

    A penny a poppy

    Millions of Canada’s plastic Remembrance Day poppies have been made by prisoners and people labelled with intellectual/developmental disabilities, who are paid pennies on the hour. It’s part of a long history of prisons and institutions using poverty to control disabled and criminalized workers.

  • Magazine

    « C’est un régime de terreur. »

    Pour mobiliser les travailleuses et travailleurs migrant∙e∙s en région rurale, il faut d’abord les trouver. La seconde étape est de réussir à desserrer l’emprise de surveillance et de peur qu’exerce leurs patrons.

  • Magazine

    “It’s a regime of terror”

    The first step in organizing rural migrant workers is finding them. The second step is breaking through their bosses’ iron grip of surveillance and fear.

  • Magazine

    “Do not ever get used to it”

    Union members and staff say that sexism, anti-Black racism, and other oppressive attitudes are deeply entrenched in many unions. Drawing on a history of women, trans, and racialized workers fighting for their place in the labour movement, trade unionists share ideas to transform unions today.

  • Magazine

    A union for sex workers

    Canada’s sole sex worker’s union wants to organize the industry coast to coast. But with members spread out in different cities, and working for online services like OnlyFans, how much support can a union provide?

  • Magazine

    The labour movement is stronger without police in it

    It’s time for unions to expel police from their membership, because a strong labour movement can only be built on a foundation of safety for Black and Indigenous members. 

  • Magazine

    The HuffPost Canada union is dead. Long live the HuffPost Canada union.

    My newsroom unionized. We were shut down two weeks later. Here’s why it was still worth it.

  • Magazine

    Tough conversations about Canada’s labour movement

    Where can we speak honestly about the weaknesses of the labour movement, offering constructive criticism and debating paths forward, without making the movement vulnerable to bad-faith attacks by neoliberal columnists and far-right ghouls? 

  • Online-only

    Real climate action means defunding the police

    A little-known arm of the RCMP has spent tens of millions of dollars brutalizing Indigenous land defenders and their allies while enforcing injunctions for resource extraction companies in B.C.

  • Online-only

    Can you do good work in Indigenous communities with bad money?

    When settler non-profits take bad money and attempt to use it to do good things in Indigenous communities, they reduce reconciliation to something imagined and managed by settler governments, non-profits, and corporations.

  • Online-only

    From the plantation to the prison

    Ohio’s reliance on for-profit prisons shows that slavery has never ended in America. Prisons have always been about herding, investing in, and marketing chattel for a profit.

  • A plume of smoke billows out of the coal fired Keephills Power Station in Wabamun, Alberta at sunset.
    Online-only

    Will the real climate platform please stand up?

    We need a climate plan that defunds and dismantles the systems of pollution, inequality, and oppression that underpin our death march towards climate catastrophe, and instead redirects resources to solutions pathways.

  • Online-only

    “That’s how we protect one another”

    Mi’kmaq water protectors and Nova Scotian settlers worked together to stop the Alton Gas project. Their success shows the power of Indigenous-settler solidarity in the fight to defend land and water.

  • Magazine

    What does freedom feel like?

    In unnaturally small prison cells, it’s common for prisoners’ eyesight to degrade due to a lack of stimulation, distance, and depth. It begs the question: which other senses does confinement diminish? To what degree? Do they come back?

  • Magazine

    One less prison to be torn down

    How prisoners helped stop the construction of a new prison camp in Kentucky

  • Magazine

    Cosmetic change is not prison reform

    “Prison reform” is an empty promise from politicians and corrections departments who have a vested interest in maintaining the status quo.

  • Magazine

    Healed people heal people

    In a world without prisons, we could break the vicious cycle of generational poverty, trauma, and incarceration.

  • Magazine

    COVID and sexism in a women’s prison

    Women have struggled to get what little we have in prison – but the COVID pandemic has stripped even that away.