• Magazine

    Planes, trains, and workers’ gains

    Toronto Pearson Airport is Canada’s largest workplace. There, workers are building up an organization that aims to match the airport’s power.

  • Magazine

    The Canadian state and Black disregard

    If “the 1990s were Black,” why is anti-Blackness still cemented into Canadian society today? Phillip Dwight Morgan reviews Rinaldo Walcott and Idil Abdillahi’s BlackLife: Post-BLM and the Struggle for Freedom.

  • Magazine

    The city vs. Big Tech

    Activists kicked Amazon’s HQ2 out of New York City. They ran Google’s new campus out of Berlin. Now, in Toronto, #BlockSidewalk wants to send Google – and their new “smart city” – packing. The battle against Big Tech is emerging as the new front in the fight for the right to the city.

  • Magazine

    Organizing the suburbs

    Why Chinese suburbanites in Toronto’s commuter belt voted for Doug Ford – and why the left has been losing its foothold in racialized working-class communities

  • Magazine

    Marvellous Grounds

    Marvellous Grounds – a new collection of writing from Between The Lines Books – rewrites the archives of Toronto’s white cis gay history to foreground the struggles and joy of queer and trans people of colour.

  • Blog

    Camped out for Justice

    Colten Boushie. Tina Fontaine. Countless others. “Something’s gotta change. Something more than fake promises and words.”

  • Magazine

    A Thousand More Beds

    The homeless shelter system in Canada’s largest city is in crisis – but anti-poverty and housing activists are fighting the systemic abandonment of homeless people, and they’re winning important gains.

  • Blog

    A Win For Tenants

    Tenants in Toronto have long been exploited by landlords imposing skyrocketing rent increases. Organizers have just secured a victory – and there’s more to come.

  • Magazine

    An Education in Gentrification

    Cuts to public services, rising housing costs, the corporatization of education, and police repression do not affect all people equally. Racialized communities like Toronto’s Regent Park bear the brunt of the neoliberal transformation of our cities.