• Magazine

    Clearing the plains

    Famine was a deliberate policy weapon used to coerce “unco-operative Indians” onto reserves and remove them from lands coveted by white settlers.

  • Magazine

    Just pretending

    Who am I? At some point or another, we have all asked ourselves this simplest of questions.

  • Magazine

    The shittiest warrior

    Comedian Ryan McMahon delivers his reflections on racism and colonialism, all perfectly punctuated with hilarious bouts of fury.

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    An accidental scarring

    Whitetail Shooting Gallery follows cousins and neighbours Jennifer and Jason as they grow up in the stark landscape of the Bear Hills near Saskatoon.

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    Good ideas are not enough

    Crass sees “collective liberation” – a term borrowed from an essay by bell hooks – as a “vision of what we want and a strategic framework to help us get there.”

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    compass/check/pulse point

    Cynthia Dewi Oka’s first collection of poetry, nomad of salt and hard water (Dinah Press), drops anchor in the transoceanic struggle of bodies against borders

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    Stories mapping place and power

    How to Get Along With Women is a finely written collection exploring the ways our identities, our most intimate relationships, and our experiences can be shaped by the world we inhabit, a world mapped by dynamics of power.

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    A steady lens and a dangerous weapon

    “Healing is a challenge in life. It is a victim’s sole obligation,” he says. “Forgotten wounds cannot be healed. So I film to heal.”

  • Magazine

    “Dreams are the worst right now”

    After a decade of captivity, Omar Khadr, the first child ever convicted of a war crime, became the last Western citizen to be repatriated out of Guantanamo Bay.

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    Monkeywrench murder mystery

    The Slickrock Paradox, by Alberta-based mystery author Stephen Legault, wraps its twisting plot around one central mystery. There are crimes for the protagonist to solve, including more than one murder, but they are almost peripheral; the core riddle is the absence of a body.

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    Heartbreaking vanishing acts

    Leslie’s primary interest is in people, and the things that haunt us or turn them into ghosts: love, desire, the search for identity.

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    Tragic yet hopeful tales of inner struggle and solidarity

    Rock Reject shares the chance to share the stories of the ghosts of Cassiar, tales of inner struggle and political solidarity that are tragic but ultimately hopeful.

  • Magazine

    An absurd apocalypse

    In the simplest terms, the book is about the Silver Jubilee of People Park, the Central Park stand-in of Malla’s unnamed island city-state; a city that feels as if it might have been stitched together by hallucinatory cartographers from dream maps of Toronto, Montreal and Manhattan.

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    Captain Naphi and the great white mole

    The origin of the railsea is unknown. Some say the gods put down the train tracks or that they extruded from the ground like exposed fossils. Others say that the rails were written “in heavenly script, that people unknowingly recited as they travelled.”

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    A powerful medicine

    Indian Horse illuminates Canada’s devastating past in an important contribution to the genre of sport fiction.

  • Magazine

    The Juliet stories

    The simple, graceful prose of the book’s first half is crafted by a careful, knowing heart; Snyder, like Juliet, lived in Nicaragua as a child, when her parents moved there to protest the Contras.

  • Magazine

    Crime, love, and rebellion: Stories of working-class tragedy

    Many of the stories fall within the noir tradition that noted crime author Dennis Lehane defines as working-class tragedy. “In Shakespeare, tragic heroes fall from mountaintops,” he writes. “In noir, they fall from curbs.”

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    Not help, but solidarity

    The Silence of Our Friends asks important questions. How are racist attitudes internalized or rejected by children? What does it take to earn the trust of others across boundary lines marked by race privilege? And, how can we make progress in the struggle against oppression?

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    Tales of heartbreak, fury and hope

    Toronto-based author Kristyn Dunnion dubs herself a “Lady Punk Warrior.” Reading The Dirt Chronicles, her most recent book, one easily grasps the aptness of the moniker.

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    On to Ottawa in marvelous, meandering prose

    In June 1935, hundreds of unemployed men took to the rails in what was dubbed the On to Ottawa Trek. The Time We All Went Marching is the story of one woman on the cusp of change.