• Online-only

    It’s time to talk about police in our unions

    Toward an abolitionist approach to decent work for all

  • Online-only

    As millions suffer from the pandemic, who’s getting rich?

    Who’s making bank off COVID-19, and who’s fighting back? A summary of Resource Movement and Briarpatch’s webinar, “Pandemic Profiteers & the Movements Trying to Stop Them”

  • Online-only

    Collective action is essential

    From socially-distanced protests to virtual union drives, five vital signs of worker organizing during COVID-19

  • Sask Dispatch

    State of the unions

    Militancy, “negative solidarity,” and fighting to win in Saskatchewan and Canada’s labour movement

  • Is Saskatchewan doing enough for workers during COVID-19?

    Saskatchewan’s freezing evictions and Trudeau’s promising $2,000 to laid-off workers. But activists are calling for cancelling rent and more protections for workers.

  • Sask Dispatch

    City’s body rub parlour decision risks worker safety

    City council voted to restrict body rub parlours to industrial areas, citing safety as a reason. But some workers say the decision will make their work more dangerous.

  • Online-only

    Oshawa could be the engine of a Green New Deal in Canada

    Workers want to nationalize the General Motors plant and build electric vehicles for Canada Post

  • Sask Dispatch Briefs

    CLC throws support behind locked-out Refinery Co-op workers

    After Unifor National president Jerry Dias was arrested on the Refinery Co-op picket line, the president of the Canadian Labour Congress flew in to support locked-out Unifor 594 members. It comes almost exactly two years after a bitter split, when Unifor disaffiliated from the CLC.

  • Magazine

    “At least hookers get wages”

    If sex were factored out of the equation, sugaring would look a lot like the precarious gig economy jobs of Uber drivers or bike couriers. And – like in other web-based jobs – sugar babies in Montreal are struggling to develop collective strength with their fellow workers.

  • Magazine

    The cost of a T-shirt

    In Honduras, women maquila workers are fighting back against the multinational garment companies that they say are endangering their health and safety.

  • Magazine

    Milking prison labour

    Canada’s prison farms are being reopened. But when prisoners will be paid pennies a day, and the fruits of their labour will likely be exported for profit, there’s little to celebrate.

  • Magazine

    Planes, trains, and workers’ gains

    Toronto Pearson Airport is Canada’s largest workplace. There, workers are building up an organization that aims to match the airport’s power.

  • Magazine

    Taking sex workers seriously

    How have restrictive new laws like America’s FOSTA/SESTA and Canada’s PCEPA impacted sex workers’ labour conditions? Lindsay Blewett reviews Red Light Labour: Sex Work Regulation, Agency, and Resistance

  • Magazine

    Bringing back the beat

    In mainstream media, labour journalism has been replaced by financial reporting and business sections. But journalism students are raising the labour beat from the grave.

  • Sask Dispatch

    What happened to the Co-op?

    The Co-op was founded on principles of equality and solidarity. But now workers and members say management is trying to run it “like a corporation.” How did we get here?

  • Sask Dispatch Briefs

    Labour tensions flare on Sask University campuses

    Support workers at the University of Saskatchewan continue to bargain to keep their pensions and increase pay. Meanwhile, a collective agreement was reached in April between the University of Regina and the University of Regina Faculty Association (URFA).

  • Sask Dispatch

    The Fight for $15 in Saskatchewan

    Saskatchewan has the second-lowest minimum wage in the country – but there’s hope in a fledgling fight for a living wage.

  • Magazine

    Land and labour

    Many people believe that there is an unbridgeable rift between left labour activism and Indigenous struggles. But recent events have made clear that “reconciliation” screeches to a halt as soon as it stands in the way of the accumulation of capital.

  • Magazine

    Be careful with each other

    Why are activists burning out, and what can be done to stop it?

  • Online-only

    Seeing a strike on the big screen

    Sorry To Bother You shows why we need anti-capitalist art that’s both radical and popular.