• Online-only

    Collective action is essential

    From socially-distanced protests to virtual union drives, five vital signs of worker organizing during COVID-19

  • Sask Dispatch

    State of the unions

    Militancy, “negative solidarity,” and fighting to win in Saskatchewan and Canada’s labour movement

  • Is Saskatchewan doing enough for workers during COVID-19?

    Saskatchewan’s freezing evictions and Trudeau’s promising $2,000 to laid-off workers. But activists are calling for cancelling rent and more protections for workers.

  • Sask Dispatch

    City’s body rub parlour decision risks worker safety

    City council voted to restrict body rub parlours to industrial areas, citing safety as a reason. But some workers say the decision will make their work more dangerous.

  • Online-only

    Oshawa could be the engine of a Green New Deal in Canada

    Workers want to nationalize the General Motors plant and build electric vehicles for Canada Post

  • Sask Dispatch Briefs

    CLC throws support behind locked-out Refinery Co-op workers

    After Unifor National president Jerry Dias was arrested on the Refinery Co-op picket line, the president of the Canadian Labour Congress flew in to support locked-out Unifor 594 members. It comes almost exactly two years after a bitter split, when Unifor disaffiliated from the CLC.

  • Magazine

    “At least hookers get wages”

    If sex were factored out of the equation, sugaring would look a lot like the precarious gig economy jobs of Uber drivers or bike couriers. And – like in other web-based jobs – sugar babies in Montreal are struggling to develop collective strength with their fellow workers.

  • Magazine

    The cost of a T-shirt

    In Honduras, women maquila workers are fighting back against the multinational garment companies that they say are endangering their health and safety.

  • Magazine

    Milking prison labour

    Canada’s prison farms are being reopened. But when prisoners will be paid pennies a day, and the fruits of their labour will likely be exported for profit, there’s little to celebrate.

  • Magazine

    Planes, trains, and workers’ gains

    Toronto Pearson Airport is Canada’s largest workplace. There, workers are building up an organization that aims to match the airport’s power.

  • Magazine

    Taking sex workers seriously

    How have restrictive new laws like America’s FOSTA/SESTA and Canada’s PCEPA impacted sex workers’ labour conditions? Lindsay Blewett reviews Red Light Labour: Sex Work Regulation, Agency, and Resistance

  • Magazine

    Bringing back the beat

    In mainstream media, labour journalism has been replaced by financial reporting and business sections. But journalism students are raising the labour beat from the grave.

  • Sask Dispatch

    What happened to the Co-op?

    The Co-op was founded on principles of equality and solidarity. But now workers and members say management is trying to run it “like a corporation.” How did we get here?

  • Sask Dispatch Briefs

    Labour tensions flare on Sask University campuses

    Support workers at the University of Saskatchewan continue to bargain to keep their pensions and increase pay. Meanwhile, a collective agreement was reached in April between the University of Regina and the University of Regina Faculty Association (URFA).

  • Sask Dispatch

    The Fight for $15 in Saskatchewan

    Saskatchewan has the second-lowest minimum wage in the country – but there’s hope in a fledgling fight for a living wage.

  • Magazine

    Land and labour

    Many people believe that there is an unbridgeable rift between left labour activism and Indigenous struggles. But recent events have made clear that “reconciliation” screeches to a halt as soon as it stands in the way of the accumulation of capital.

  • Magazine

    Be careful with each other

    Why are activists burning out, and what can be done to stop it?

  • Online-only

    Seeing a strike on the big screen

    Sorry To Bother You shows why we need anti-capitalist art that’s both radical and popular.

  • Magazine

    Should unions say no to closed-door negotiations?

    Unions in Canada and the U.S. are throwing open the doors to collective bargaining meetings, hoping to win stronger contracts and more engaged members. Will it work?

  • Magazine

    Remembering the 1919 Drumheller strike

    “Hell’s Hole,” “the Devil’s Row,” and “the Western Front” – these were the nicknames for the coal mines of the Drumheller valley. In 1919, around 6,500 Drumheller coal miners walked off the job after voting to join the radical and militant One Big Union. Nearly a hundred years later, the 1919 Drumheller strike remains one of the most famous examples of workers’ power on the Prairies.