• Magazine

    “At least hookers get wages”

    If sex were factored out of the equation, sugaring would look a lot like the precarious gig economy jobs of Uber drivers or bike couriers. And – like in other web-based jobs – sugar babies in Montreal are struggling to develop collective strength with their fellow workers.

  • Magazine

    The cost of a T-shirt

    In Honduras, women maquila workers are fighting back against the multinational garment companies that they say are endangering their health and safety.

  • Magazine

    Milking prison labour

    Canada’s prison farms are being reopened. But when prisoners will be paid pennies a day, and the fruits of their labour will likely be exported for profit, there’s little to celebrate.

  • Magazine

    Planes, trains, and workers’ gains

    Toronto Pearson Airport is Canada’s largest workplace. There, workers are building up an organization that aims to match the airport’s power.

  • Magazine

    Taking sex workers seriously

    How have restrictive new laws like America’s FOSTA/SESTA and Canada’s PCEPA impacted sex workers’ labour conditions? Lindsay Blewett reviews Red Light Labour: Sex Work Regulation, Agency, and Resistance

  • Magazine

    Bringing back the beat

    In mainstream media, labour journalism has been replaced by financial reporting and business sections. But journalism students are raising the labour beat from the grave.

  • Sask Dispatch

    What happened to the Co-op?

    The Co-op was founded on principles of equality and solidarity. But now workers and members say management is trying to run it “like a corporation.” How did we get here?

  • Sask Dispatch Briefs

    Labour tensions flare on Sask University campuses

    Support workers at the University of Saskatchewan continue to bargain to keep their pensions and increase pay. Meanwhile, a collective agreement was reached in April between the University of Regina and the University of Regina Faculty Association (URFA).

  • Sask Dispatch

    The Fight for $15 in Saskatchewan

    Saskatchewan has the second-lowest minimum wage in the country – but there’s hope in a fledgling fight for a living wage.

  • Magazine

    Land and labour

    Many people believe that there is an unbridgeable rift between left labour activism and Indigenous struggles. But recent events have made clear that “reconciliation” screeches to a halt as soon as it stands in the way of the accumulation of capital.

  • Magazine

    Be careful with each other

    Why are activists burning out, and what can be done to stop it?

  • Blog

    Seeing a strike on the big screen

    Sorry To Bother You shows why we need anti-capitalist art that’s both radical and popular.

  • Magazine

    Should unions say no to closed-door negotiations?

    Unions in Canada and the U.S. are throwing open the doors to collective bargaining meetings, hoping to win stronger contracts and more engaged members. Will it work?

  • Magazine

    Remembering the 1919 Drumheller strike

    “Hell’s Hole,” “the Devil’s Row,” and “the Western Front” – these were the nicknames for the coal mines of the Drumheller valley. In 1919, around 6,500 Drumheller coal miners walked off the job after voting to join the radical and militant One Big Union. Nearly a hundred years later, the 1919 Drumheller strike remains one of the most famous examples of workers’ power on the Prairies.

  • Magazine

    We Won’t Back Down

    The Fight for $15 in Ontario reminds us that when employers go on the attack or cry wolf about economic crises, workers need not back down.

  • Magazine

    The Wobbly Print Project

    Artist Dylan Miner has set out to reproduce and digitize the prodigious art of the Industrial Workers of the World.

  • Blog

    Making Sense of the Unifor–CLC Split

    A disaffiliation that threatens union power in a vulnerable time.

  • Magazine

    Showing Up for Faculty

    It was the faculty’s first strike since 1989. Predictably, the administration tried to pit the students against the faculty, but the deep relationships between students and faculty flipped the power dynamic.

  • Blog

    Working With Your Hands

    The only way to survive is to make a living wage and I can’t do that unless I sell my hands, my back, and my brain as a skilled labourer.

  • Magazine

    The Second Crisis

    How workers on the front lines of Canada’s opioid crisis are coping – and what organized labour can do to support them.