• Magazine

    Be careful with each other

    Why are activists burning out, and what can be done to stop it?

  • Blog

    Seeing a strike on the big screen

    Sorry To Bother You shows why we need anti-capitalist art that’s both radical and popular.

  • Magazine

    Should unions say no to closed-door negotiations?

    Unions in Canada and the U.S. are throwing open the doors to collective bargaining meetings, hoping to win stronger contracts and more engaged members. Will it work?

  • Magazine

    Remembering the 1919 Drumheller strike

    “Hell’s Hole,” “the Devil’s Row,” and “the Western Front” – these were the nicknames for the coal mines of the Drumheller valley. In 1919, around 6,500 Drumheller coal miners walked off the job after voting to join the radical and militant One Big Union. Nearly a hundred years later, the 1919 Drumheller strike remains one of the most famous examples of workers’ power on the Prairies.

  • Magazine

    We Won’t Back Down

    The Fight for $15 in Ontario reminds us that when employers go on the attack or cry wolf about economic crises, workers need not back down.

  • Magazine

    The Wobbly Print Project

    Artist Dylan Miner has set out to reproduce and digitize the prodigious art of the Industrial Workers of the World.

  • Blog

    Making Sense of the Unifor–CLC Split

    A disaffiliation that threatens union power in a vulnerable time.

  • Magazine

    Showing Up for Faculty

    It was the faculty’s first strike since 1989. Predictably, the administration tried to pit the students against the faculty, but the deep relationships between students and faculty flipped the power dynamic.

  • Blog

    Working With Your Hands

    The only way to survive is to make a living wage and I can’t do that unless I sell my hands, my back, and my brain as a skilled labourer.

  • Magazine

    The Second Crisis

    How workers on the front lines of Canada’s opioid crisis are coping – and what organized labour can do to support them.

  • Magazine

    Science After Harper

    Funding for basic research is declining, leaving scientists unable to work effectively. While researchers are spending more time applying for scarce and competitive grants, scientific labour is placed on hold.

  • Magazine

    Policing Black Lives: The Colour Line

    The history of segregated labour in Canada’s Jim-Crow era

  • Magazine

    Unions in Court

    How does the labour movement use the courts to advance the rights of workers?

  • Magazine

    Unions Can Be Of Our Making

    Building a humane system to organize labour and resources is an enormous task, but it’s possible and urgent.

  • Magazine

    Moving Past Precarity

    The world of work has changed and the labour movement has to meet this challenge and move beyond it.

  • Magazine

    Working for the Weekend

    Workers have been winning decreased work hours since the Industrial Revolution, shortening the workday from 12 hours to 10 to 8. Why stop there?

  • Magazine

    The Midinette Spring

    Industrial Montreal was a hotbed of cheap, easily exploited women’s labour. “You’ll never organize girls,” labour leaders were warned. But Rose Pesotta was determined to try “a woman’s approach” to unionizing.

  • Magazine

    The Herd at the Pen

    When Stephen Harper’s government shuttered prison farms across the country without a coherent explanation, some saw an opportunity to transform them into animal sanctuaries.

  • Magazine

    Inside Saskatchewan’s Oil Economy

    How are workers in the oil and gas industry affected by Saskaboom’s bust?

  • Magazine

    Mexico’s Education Standoff

    When Mexican teachers went on strike to protest President Enrique Peña Nieto’s neoliberal education reforms, the state, backed by major financial institutions, cracked down in a bloody attempt at democratic suppression. What does the teachers’ fight signal for the future of public education?