• Magazine

    From the ground up

    During the economic expansion that followed WWII, organized labour won significant gains in exchange for embracing capitalism. Long since the crises of the 1970s, and decades into organized labour’s decline, major labour organizations still talk as if a return to that postwar compromise is possible. What can be done – what is being done – to challenge this orientation?

  • Magazine

    Courting collaboration

    Pinehouse residents Fred Pederson, John Smerek, and Dale Smith all feel like they have been wearing targets on their backs since their names appeared in a lawsuit filed in June.

  • Magazine

    “An irresistible force”

    Before dawn one Sunday in June 2010, nearly 1,000 people converged on the Port of Oakland in northern California. Following a well-devised plan, they marched to the dockside gates of SSA Marine, one of the world’s largest shipping corporations, and awaited the arrival of the Israeli cargo ship Zim Shenzhen.

  • Magazine

    The gentry have landed

    Capital and community are colliding in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside as developers and politicians dispossess low-income residents of one of their only assets: their neighbourhood.

  • Magazine

    Hunger’s empire

    What does it mean for Guantanamo Bay prisoners to assert their essential human dignity, and to seek justice, by choosing to starve? From freedom fighters under the British Raj to Chief Theresa Spence and the detainees of Guantanamo, physician Baijayanta Mukhopadhyay explores the insistent threat of the hunger strike.

  • Online-only

    A homegrown genocide

    The nutrition experiments conducted by the Canadian government on malnourished Native children are part of a long history of experiments in nation-breaking that continue to target children. Being open and honest about what was done to these children and their families is a first step in truth telling about our shared past.

  • Online-only

    Thomas Mulcair should drop acid

    I know it sounds desperate, but a hallucination or two might open up his mind a bit. Perhaps he’ll realize that he who plays good cop forges his own hand cuffs.

  • Magazine

    Good ideas are not enough

    Crass sees “collective liberation” – a term borrowed from an essay by bell hooks – as a “vision of what we want and a strategic framework to help us get there.”

  • Magazine

    Social spaces summit

    Through the intersections of social centres, strategies for change emerge.

  • Magazine

    Down in a Hole

    This is the kind of place where Ashley Smith died in 2007. It is also the kind of place where Julie Bilotta gave birth on a cement floor last year.

  • Magazine

    No force more powerful

    Nothing can really convey the power of moments where people come together to realize their collective strength, but we thought we’d try anyway

  • Magazine

    Sovereignty and social transformation

    In the final days of Quebec’s 2012 election campaign, many journalists and federalist politicians warned Canadians of the dangers of a Parti Québécois victory. Progressive movements across Canada have a lot to learn about what is made possible when the question of independence is raised.

  • Magazine

    Interns unite!

    If decent, full-time work is getting harder to come by, the same can’t be said for internships, whether unpaid or barely paid. From street protests to online campaigns, the emerging intern activism is one part of the wider effort by fresh actors to reformat labour politics for precarious times.

  • Magazine

    Defunding the public interest

    Some PIRG supporters fear that adopting controversial positions will provoke attack. Especially after a defunding effort, PIRGs tend to endure a chilling effect during which volunteers and staff can be seduced by “neutrality” and engage in self-censorship.

  • Magazine

    The combustible campus

    The neoliberalization of the university has produced its own antagonists, and it is from the ranks of those who stand to lose the most from this transformation – students and academic workers – that the greatest conflicts have emanated.

  • Magazine

    Letter from the editor

    The tenacity and vibrancy of the Quebec student uprising is delivering a wake-up call to the left across the country.

  • Magazine

    Incubating ideas

    Fernwood has given hundreds of visionaries a voice they’d otherwise lack, taking financial risks many publishers avoid.

  • Magazine

    Ban the blood services ban

    The first and only time he gave blood, Nick Shaw felt like a hero. The Canadian Blood Services (CBS) advertised a clinic at his high school with posters, announcements over the PA system, and in-class talks by teachers and nurses. Blood donation was touted as a moral imperative.

  • Magazine

    Why strike support isn’t enough

    In the current climate of government attacks on the public service and on collective bargaining across Canada, the need for community organizers to build relationships between workers is now, more than ever, an essential part of mounting an effective challenge to austerity.

  • Magazine

    United against austerity

    At the same time, the austerity assault continues in Toronto and across Canada with slashes to social services ranging from libraries to daycares, emergency services, and public transit.