• Magazine

    Violent relations

    What is the role of settler Canadians in the colonial present?

  • Magazine

    Decolonizing the emergency

    Amid the crisis of violence against Indigenous women in Canada,13 Blackfoot women in southern Alberta participate in a unique project to decolonize women’s emergency shelters.

  • Magazine

    Art and the ones missing

    In China and in Canada, artists are finding powerful new ways to commemorate the victims of ongoing government policies and inaction, to honour the dead and the missing, and to call for accountability.

  • Magazine

    A short introduction to the Two Row Wampum

    The return to a 400-year-old treaty relationship.

  • Magazine

    Hijacked canoes and settler ships

    Is Indigenous land reclamation a form of environmentalism? How does Indigenous resurgence relate to left-wing political traditions?

  • Magazine

    Clearing the plains

    Famine was a deliberate policy weapon used to coerce “unco-operative Indians” onto reserves and remove them from lands coveted by white settlers.

  • Magazine

    A legacy of Canadian child care

    What was it like to be caught in the Sixties Scoop, when thousands of Indigenous children were taken from their families and placed in settler households?

  • Magazine

    Letter from the editor

    The primacy of place and, more pointedly, an essential relation to the land is largely absent from the aesthetic theories of those in the modernist and Marxist traditions. In a settler-colonial society, such abstract sensibilities are untenable.

  • Magazine

    Reclaiming ourselves by name

    The renaming of lakes, rivers, lands, peoples, and individuals by the Canadian settler state can be challenged.

  • Magazine

    Politics based on justice, diplomacy based on love

    Treaties are not about the cession of land but rather a commitment to stand with one another.

  • Magazine

    Settler Treaty Rights

    Treaties are foundational agreements that provide a common framework for peaceful co-existence between First Nations and settlers. Some “treaty abolitionists” argue that treaties grant particular individuals special rights and privileges, creating inequality in our community—and therefore that “treaty rights” should be taken away. But they forget that we are all, in fact, treaty people. Treaties are two-party agreements that bestow rights and obligations upon both parties. Settlers too were granted generous treaty rights that they would be foolish to abrogate.