• Magazine

    Oil & water

    In Newfoundland and Labrador, workers look to transition out of oil and gas, into renewable energy. But as these industries charge forward, Inuit activists are also struggling to protect their land and water.

  • Blog

    To be a warrior

    What it really means when Indigenous protesters say “Bring back our children.” An interview with Chasity Delorme and Prescott Demas from Camp: Justice For Our Stolen Children.

  • Magazine

    “We don’t need permission to be free”

    The Zapatistas have always been on the frontlines of the opposition to NAFTA. In March, thousands of women Zapatistas and activists gathered in Chiapas to share their struggles and victories in building a world beyond capitalism.

  • Magazine

    Uprooted

    Through the ’60s, ’70s, and ’80s, the Canadian government took thousands of First Nations children from their families and placed them in white foster homes. I was one of them. Alienated from my language, culture, and community, I was taught to hate my people.

  • Magazine

    INSURGENCE/RESURGENCE at the Winnipeg Art Gallery

    The largest contemporary Indigenous art exhibition in the Winnipeg Art Gallery’s history, INSURGENCE/RESURGENCE is framed as an act of rebellion and a revitalization of Indigenous culture that challenges dominant Western methods of artmaking and presentation.

  • Blog

    We can’t talk about reconciliation while we’re still justifying killing Indigenous people

    Colten Boushie’s killing and Gerald Stanley’s acquittal make it clear: justice has nothing to do with lip service, and everything to do with tangible action.

  • Magazine

    States of Emergency

    In this Andrea Walker Memorial Fund winning piece, Lindsay Nixon explores what makes the colonial world risky for Indigenous peoples with HIV.

  • Magazine

    Feminism’s White Default

    White supremacy continues to permeate feminist organizing in Canada.

  • Magazine

    Art and the ones missing

    In China and in Canada, artists are finding powerful new ways to commemorate the victims of ongoing government policies and inaction, to honour the dead and the missing, and to call for accountability.

  • Magazine

    Walking for justice

    Following the loss of her 22-year-old niece, Gladys Radek has set out on a series of coast-to-coast treks seeking justice for the hundreds of missing and murdered Indigenous women across Canada.