From the unsettling threat of hunger strikes to the problem with anti-bullying rhetoric, this issue is brimming with testy content. The battle for Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside, Rosa Luxemburg in the 21st century, letters from survivors of sexual violence, farmers vs. Monsanto, a firsthand account of the Sixties Scoop — and more!

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  • Magazine

    Letter from the editor

    Dignity is, ultimately, why we are on the political left. It is connected to the energy by which we can reckon with domination rather than crumple in its grasp. It is why we have each other.

  • Magazine

    The gentry have landed

    Capital and community are colliding in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside as developers and politicians dispossess low-income residents of one of their only assets: their neighbourhood.

  • Magazine

    Hunger’s empire

    What does it mean for Guantanamo Bay prisoners to assert their essential human dignity, and to seek justice, by choosing to starve? From freedom fighters under the British Raj to Chief Theresa Spence and the detainees of Guantanamo, physician Baijayanta Mukhopadhyay explores the insistent threat of the hunger strike.

  • Magazine

    More than a hero

    She has long been honoured as a revolutionary martyr, but can her theories about capitalism and working-class organization guide us today? In a time of austerity and flaring social unrest, Ingo Schmidt reveals Luxemburg’s key insights for understanding our world – and organizing for a better one.

  • Magazine

    Dear sister

    Letters from Survivors of Sexual Violence from the forthcoming AK Press anthology

  • Magazine

    Weeding out Monsanto

    Canadian farmers have successfully blocked genetically modified flax, wheat, and pigs. Now the fight is on to keep out Monsanto alfalfa. It’s a fight farmers and their consumer allies can win, writes Cathy Holtslander.

  • Magazine

    A legacy of Canadian child care

    What was it like to be caught in the Sixties Scoop, when thousands of Indigenous children were taken from their families and placed in settler households?

  • Magazine

    “Sheriff John Brown always hated me”

    Afrikans living in Toronto and across Canada face targeted police profiling and violence. Organizer Ajamu Nangwaya explains why and what can be done.

  • Magazine

    Just pretending

    Who am I? At some point or another, we have all asked ourselves this simplest of questions.

  • Magazine

    Beyond bullying

    The term “bullying” obscures the dynamics of gendered violence in cases like Rehtaeh Parsons’ and Amanda Todd’s. The vague language of anti-bullying campaigns and legislation do little to address systemic misogyny and rape culture.