The July/August issue offers a wide array of stories including prison expansion on Indigenous sacred sites, the Quebec student strike, popular education as a tool for decolonization, the remilitarization of Guatemala to clear space for multinational corporations, and more.

  • Magazine

    Letter from the editor

    The tenacity and vibrancy of the Quebec student uprising is delivering a wake-up call to the left across the country.

  • Magazine

    The spoils of an undeclared war

    The presence of drug traffickers in Laguna del Tigre hasn’t affected oil production. In fact, there’s a renewed interest from oil companies in Guatemala’s oil.

  • Magazine

    Popular education lives

    Interview with Anne Docherty, reflecting upon the formative influences on her understanding of popular education and how she uses popular education as a framework to advance decolonization and regional self-determination.
  • Magazine

    Incubating ideas

    Fernwood has given hundreds of visionaries a voice they’d otherwise lack, taking financial risks many publishers avoid.

  • Magazine

    Ban the blood services ban

    The first and only time he gave blood, Nick Shaw felt like a hero. The Canadian Blood Services (CBS) advertised a clinic at his high school with posters, announcements over the PA system, and in-class talks by teachers and nurses. Blood donation was touted as a moral imperative.

  • Magazine

    NGOs and empire

    This article is excerpted from Paved with Good Intentions: Canada’s Development NGOs from Idealism to Imperialism, released April 2012 by Fernwood Publishing fernwoodpublishing.ca

  • Magazine

    Boiling point

    The lack of safe drinking water in First Nations communities is just one example of the long-standing underfunding and neglect that has led to the substandard living conditions that plague First Nations communities across Canada.

  • Magazine

    The Juliet stories

    The simple, graceful prose of the book’s first half is crafted by a careful, knowing heart; Snyder, like Juliet, lived in Nicaragua as a child, when her parents moved there to protest the Contras.

  • Magazine

    Why strike support isn’t enough

    In the current climate of government attacks on the public service and on collective bargaining across Canada, the need for community organizers to build relationships between workers is now, more than ever, an essential part of mounting an effective challenge to austerity.