How is science actually done today and what is its role in social change? Can a student divestment campaign curb the tarsands? How are tenants organizing for better housing? What is the G8’s plan for African farmers? How does unemployment shape self-worth? What’s ahead for northern Saskatchewan’s wild rice harvesters? This issue tackles these questions and more!

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  • Magazine

    Good ancestors

    How can we become the ancestors future generations demand that we be?

  • Magazine

    Tarsands divestment and its discontents

    Leading activists discuss the strengths and possible pitfalls of a burgeoning campus movement to have universities divest from the fossil fuel economy. Can the campaign succeed?

  • Magazine

    “Our only refuge”

    In the wake of the economic meltdown of 2008, what does unemployment teach us about who we are and what our lives mean?

  • Magazine

    Science and liberation

    In the midst of the Harper government’s war on science, we must reconsider how science is done today, how it might it be done in a better society, and what its role is in the struggle for a just and sustainable world.

  • Magazine

    A timeline of science and the left

    A graphic timeline of intersections between science and the political left from 1902 to the present.

  • Magazine

    Cracking the soil in Uganda

    How will subsistence farmers like Ninsiima Florence fare under the G8’s New Alliance for Food Security and Nutrition?

  • Magazine

    Evicting the landlord

    Through strategic organizing, tenants can win increased legal protections from eviction, funding for new social housing, and, eventually, the full control of their own homes. In concert with other movements, these efforts can help build the organizing skills and collective power that are necessary to challenge a political and economic system that privileges property and those who own it above all else.

  • Magazine

    Wild rice and high water

    The majority of Canada’s wild rice is grown in the lakes of northern Saskatchewan, where changing weather and industrial development threaten the traditional harvest.

  • Magazine

    Walking for justice

    Following the loss of her 22-year-old niece, Gladys Radek has set out on a series of coast-to-coast treks seeking justice for the hundreds of missing and murdered Indigenous women across Canada.

  • Magazine

    One game at a time: why sports matter

    In his new book, Matt Hern argues that “sports offers us an arena where we can resist neoliberal logics and bodily encounter liberatory ideals.”

  • Magazine

    Language is a map

    It’s been three decades since Canadian legislators replaced the word “rape” with “sexual assault.” Against a backdrop of persistent sexual violence, changes in language reveal how much work is yet to be done.