M09bdb4d38d658c2a566e063ed79d3de41

Yutaka Dirks is a tenant rights organizer, journalist and writer whose work can be found in Alberta Views, THIS, rabble.ca, Ricepaper Magazine, the Journal of Law and Social Policy, and elsewhere.

  • Magazine

    Moving Past Precarity

    The world of work has changed and the labour movement has to meet this challenge and move beyond it.

  • Magazine

    War in the Neighborhood

    War in the Neighborhood, a graphic novel about the struggles of squatters at war with police and developers, is re-read 17 years later with fresh eyes.

  • Magazine

    Why the Left Needs Experts

    If social justice movements are to succeed, they have to be right.

  • Magazine

    What’s at Stake in the Fight for $15?

    As the fight for a $15/hour minimum wage heats up in Canada, what lessons can low-wage workers learn from the successes of the movement in the U.S.?

  • Magazine

    Father, Son, and the Alberta Housing Boom

    Critical reflections on life and labour in the home building trades.

  • Magazine

    The Art of the Possible

    Yutaka Dirks interviews our creative writing contest judges.

  • Magazine

    Creative writing contest winners!

    Winners and thank yous.

  • Magazine

    Evicting the landlord

    Through strategic organizing, tenants can win increased legal protections from eviction, funding for new social housing, and, eventually, the full control of their own homes. In concert with other movements, these efforts can help build the organizing skills and collective power that are necessary to challenge a political and economic system that privileges property and those who own it above all else.

  • Magazine

    Until the heart is revealed

    *Art in its many forms slices through ideology and approaches truth better than any argument, probably because, in the end, art tries to find the heart of the matter rather than the brain of it.

  • Magazine

    Just pretending

    Who am I? At some point or another, we have all asked ourselves this simplest of questions.

  • Magazine

    An accidental scarring

    Whitetail Shooting Gallery follows cousins and neighbours Jennifer and Jason as they grow up in the stark landscape of the Bear Hills near Saskatoon.

  • Magazine

    Good ideas are not enough

    Crass sees “collective liberation” – a term borrowed from an essay by bell hooks – as a “vision of what we want and a strategic framework to help us get there.”

  • Magazine

    Announcing Writing in the Margins contest winners!

    This issue of Briarpatch features the winners of our second annual Writing in the Margins creative writing contest.

  • Magazine

    Stories mapping place and power

    How to Get Along With Women is a finely written collection exploring the ways our identities, our most intimate relationships, and our experiences can be shaped by the world we inhabit, a world mapped by dynamics of power.

  • Magazine

    Monkeywrench murder mystery

    The Slickrock Paradox, by Alberta-based mystery author Stephen Legault, wraps its twisting plot around one central mystery. There are crimes for the protagonist to solve, including more than one murder, but they are almost peripheral; the core riddle is the absence of a body.

  • Magazine

    Heartbreaking vanishing acts

    Leslie’s primary interest is in people, and the things that haunt us or turn them into ghosts: love, desire, the search for identity.

  • Magazine

    Tragic yet hopeful tales of inner struggle and solidarity

    Rock Reject shares the chance to share the stories of the ghosts of Cassiar, tales of inner struggle and political solidarity that are tragic but ultimately hopeful.

  • Magazine

    Fierce hearts

    Briarpatch books columnist Yutaka Dirks caught up with our creative writing contest judges to talk about the writing life and finding the balance between the personal and the political as an author.

  • Magazine

    An absurd apocalypse

    In the simplest terms, the book is about the Silver Jubilee of People Park, the Central Park stand-in of Malla’s unnamed island city-state; a city that feels as if it might have been stitched together by hallucinatory cartographers from dream maps of Toronto, Montreal and Manhattan.

  • Magazine

    Captain Naphi and the great white mole

    The origin of the railsea is unknown. Some say the gods put down the train tracks or that they extruded from the ground like exposed fossils. Others say that the rails were written “in heavenly script, that people unknowingly recited as they travelled.”