Artistic interventions in John A. Macdonald’s bicentennial celebrations. An activist roundtable on the federal election. The role of patriarchy in permaculture. The meaning of elections for Six Nations, the largest reserve in Canada. The new wave of food co-ops. Heritage hipsters and gentrification. An interview with members of Feeding My Family about food security in Nunavut. Regulatory headaches for small farmers. These features and more!

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  • Magazine

    Beyond Holding Your Nose

    What a politician is willing to do is never as important as what we can do together when we organize.

  • Magazine

    Kill, Clean, Eat, and Repeat

    Singing the praises of hunting.

  • Magazine

    Capitalism Sucks and Must Be Crushed

    Comic artist Stephanie McMillan uses clear examples to explain how the capitalist system is fast murdering the planet.

  • Magazine

    Regulatory Snarls for Small-scale Farmers

    Consumers and foodies are clamouring for ethical local foods, but some farmers are in a pickle just trying to get their goods to market.

  • Magazine

    Struggling for Food Security in Nunavut

    Northerners are organizing to address the crisis of food insecurity in their communities.

  • Magazine

    The Meaning of Elections for Six Nations

    The conflict between the hereditary leadership and the elected band council on the largest reserve in Canada provides an education in colonialism.

  • Magazine

    The New Wave of Food Co-ops

    An intergenerational movement of food co-ops is emerging across Canada to create the roots of a co-operative food system.

  • Magazine

    What to Do About the Federal Election

    Radical perspectives on the federal election.

  • Magazine

    Talkin’ Back to Johnny Mac

    Bicentennial celebrations for Canada’s first prime minister are being met with artistic interventions.

  • Magazine

    When Hipsters Dream of the 1890s

    Fashion and dispossession in East Vancouver.

  • Magazine

    Permaculture or Spermaculture?

    Women continue to be under-represented in permaculture’s dominant forms of knowledge dissemination.