• Magazine

    New traditions

    As precarious work becomes the norm, labour activists need to combine the best of our traditions with new approaches that respond to the changing realities of work. To do that, we look to the history of community unionism, worker centres, and whole worker organizing.

  • Magazine

    Exorcise Amazon

    Amazon has made a name for itself in pioneering new strategies for worker exploitation. The best way to fight back is to build worker power from below.

  • Magazine

    Delivering justice

    Three months after Foodora couriers won the right to unionize – a historic win for app-based workers – Foodora announced it was leaving Canada. Five worker leaders talk about the highs and lows of the campaign, and what’s next for Foodsters United.

  • Magazine

    “At least hookers get wages”

    If sex were factored out of the equation, sugaring would look a lot like the precarious gig economy jobs of Uber drivers or bike couriers. And – like in other web-based jobs – sugar babies in Montreal are struggling to develop collective strength with their fellow workers.

  • Magazine

    The Precariat’s Parental Leave

    Between nursing, nurturing, and sleep deprivation, how does a freelancer making a stable living while parenting?

  • Magazine

    Moving Past Precarity

    The world of work has changed and the labour movement has to meet this challenge and move beyond it.

  • Magazine

    Regression Analysis

    In Atlantic Canada, where a succession of corporate-compliant provincial governments have created an environment conducive to scabbing and receptive to the business lobby, workers are bargaining not with employers, but with fear, fragmentation, and poor prospects for a stable future of work.

  • Online-only

    Can the NDP help millennials?

    NDP MP Niki Ashton has wrapped up her national tour on the problem of precarious work facing millennials in Canada. Should we hold out hope for an NDP-led solution to working class precarity among young people?