• Magazine

    Whose land is it, anyways?

    An interview with Ginnifer Menominee on treaty holders, ceremonial jurisdiction, and Land Back in Guelph.

  • Magazine

    Manufacturing Wet’suwet’en consent

    Why the Canadian government and industry are doing everything they can to avoid consulting with hereditary leadership on Wet’suwet’en yintah

  • Magazine

    mâmawiwikowin

    European political traditions would have us believe that being sovereign means asserting exclusive control over a territory, whereas Prairie NDN political traditions teach us that it is through our relationship with others that we are sovereign.

  • Magazine

    Four case studies of Land Back in action

    From land trusts to mushroom permitting, here are some examples of what Land Back looks like on the ground

  • Magazine

    What is Land Back? A Settler FAQ

    Settlers have a lot of questions about Land Back: What does it mean? Who will the land be given back to? How will it be governed? Will settlers be forced to leave the continent? Brooks Arcand-Paul and Nickita Longman help clear up some of the frequently asked questions about the Land Back movement.

  • Magazine

    “Land Back” is more than the sum of its parts

    When we say “Land Back” we want the system that is land to be alive so that it can perpetuate itself, and perpetuate us as an extension of itself. That’s what we want back: our place in keeping land alive and spiritually connected. 

  • Magazine

    A world of many worlds

    Is the idea of Indigenous sovereignty really in conflict with the well-being of migrant communities? A review of “Home Rule: National Sovereignty and the Separation of Natives and Migrants.”

  • Magazine

    Reviving Indigenous authorities in Guatemala

    In Guatemala, traditional Indigenous governments are battling municipalities and transnational corporations for control of their land

  • Magazine

    Tarsands vs. treaty

    The Beaver Lake Cree Nation is taking on the tarsands, arguing that they represent too much industrial development in the face of constitutionally protected treaty rights.

  • Magazine

    “Indigenizing” child apprehension

    In Ontario’s Indigenous child welfare agencies, the superficial trappings of culture take the place of policies that would grant jurisdiction over Indigenous children to Indigenous families, individuals, and communities.

  • Magazine

    This story is redress

    I have a memory. At least I think it’s a memory – it’s hard to tell sometimes between dreams, nightmares, visions, and memories. I’m choosing memory because it feels like a memory.

  • Magazine

    Making love under Indian Acts

    How can we have reconciliation if we are terminating the people whom settlers have to reconcile with?

  • Online-only

    To be a warrior

    What it really means when Indigenous protesters say “Bring back our children.” An interview with Chasity Delorme and Prescott Demas from Camp: Justice For Our Stolen Children.

  • Online-only

    Dismantle the AFN – before it causes any more damage to Indigenous sovereignty

    No matter who’s elected national chief, the AFN is fundamentally flawed, and beyond being saved by reforms.

  • Magazine

    Uprooted

    Through the ’60s, ’70s, and ’80s, the Canadian government took thousands of First Nations children from their families and placed them in white foster homes. I was one of them. Alienated from my language, culture, and community, I was taught to hate my people.

  • Magazine

    Colonial courts and settler justice

    Most days during Gerald Stanley’s trial, the courtroom could be cut in half: the white half – family and supporters of the accused – and the brown half – family and supporters of the victim.

  • Magazine

    Silencing Opposition of the Site C Dam

    Protesters of the Site C dam in the Peace River Valley are facing a civil suit from both BC Hydro and the B.C. government.

  • Magazine

    INSURGENCE/RESURGENCE at the Winnipeg Art Gallery

    The largest contemporary Indigenous art exhibition in the Winnipeg Art Gallery’s history, INSURGENCE/RESURGENCE is framed as an act of rebellion and a revitalization of Indigenous culture that challenges dominant Western methods of artmaking and presentation.

  • Online-only

    We can’t talk about reconciliation while we’re still justifying killing Indigenous people

    Colten Boushie’s killing and Gerald Stanley’s acquittal make it clear: justice has nothing to do with lip service, and everything to do with tangible action.

  • Online-only

    Land-based Resistance at the Unist’ot’en Camp

    The Unist’ot’en continue to square off with pipeline companies and the RCMP.