• Magazine

    Little footprint on the Prairie

    As Saskatchewan celebrates a period of economic growth and prosperity not seen since the first three decades of the 20th century, it does so at a precarious time for the planet.

  • Magazine

    Damned if you do, damned if you don’t

    Once Hydro-Québec completes work, now started, to divert most of the kilometre-wide Rupert River into reservoirs along the Eastmain and La Grande River systems further north, the impact on the traditional hunting, fishing and trapping grounds—and on the culture they sustain—will be devastating. Seeking to stop the development, the province’s 16,000 Cree have tried tactics ranging from protest to legal action, but have had very little success so far in shaking the public utility’s addiction to mega projects.

  • Magazine

    Letter from the editor

    What happens when large numbers of people give up on the paradigm of “progress”—the idea that each generation will invariably live in greater material comfort and prosperity than the generation before?

  • Magazine

    “It’s tremendous fun to fight back”

    Derrick Jensen joined a Regina, Saskatchewan, audience via videoconference for a wide-ranging conversation. As usual, he challenged the audience to focus on protecting life rather than lifestyle, and urged them to recognize the breadth of the changes necessary to protect life on earth.

  • Magazine

    Stupid to the last drop

    A book review of William Marsden’s, Stupid to the last drop: How Alberta is bringing environmental armageddon to Canada (And doesn’t seem to care)

  • Magazine

    Canada’s deadly secret

    Book review of Jim Harding’s -Canada’s Deadly Secret: Saskatchewan Uranium and the Global Nuclear System_

  • Magazine

    “We can no longer be sacrificed”

  • Magazine

    Letter from the editor

    The Harper Government’s performance at the UN climate change conference in Bali in December certainly didn’t make this country any friends. Alongside Japan and the U.S., our official delegation—which, unprecedentedly, did not include NGOs or opposition politicians—did its utmost to scuttle the world’s last, best hope for averting extreme climate change, and only bowed to global consensus on a watered-down agreement in the face of concerted domestic and international pressure.

  • Magazine

    Liquid assets

    Despite much ado over the world’s dwindling oil supplies, the real lifeblood of the planet is water—and we are quickly draining the well dry.

  • Magazine

    Bikes without borders

    What connects singer/songwriter Fred Eaglesmith, a rape crisis centre in Brantford, Ontario, and an anti-poverty group in nearby Port Dover? They’ve all come together to help ensure the safety of migrant farm workers on Canadian roads. Perhaps an odd combination for social justice work, but it seems to be working.

  • Magazine

    Bursting the ethanol bubble

    Ethanol’s environmental credentials are dubious at best. Governments everywhere have managed to ignore this mounting evidence. Instead, they have piled aboard the ethanol bandwagon, plowing significant amounts of taxpayer dollars into the production of ethanol and other “biofuels,” claiming this will help both the environment and farmers’ net incomes.

  • Magazine

    Naturally suspicious

    Does the rise of the “naturals” industry represent a small step in the right direction or merely a distraction from a much larger problem?

  • Magazine

    Dinner plate ethics

    As long as hunting is dismissed as unethical while the act of paying for food at the grocery store is seen as benign, we are unlikely to make much progress

  • Magazine

    Alternative routes

    Shayna and Dominique have just set out on a cross-Canada trip to seek out intentional communities and learn from their experiences. They’ll be blogging about what they find right here on www.briarpatchmagazine.com.