• Magazine

    Sharing treaty land

    In rural Saskatchewan, a network of settler landholders and Indigenous people are finding a new way to share land.

  • Magazine

    “Built on a foundation of white supremacy”

    Coverage of Indigenous land defence reveals journalism’s symbiotic relationship with settler colonialism. Can we chart a path forward for decolonial and anti-colonial journalism?

  • Magazine

    Filipinos across Canada respond to pandemic inequalities

    From live-in caregivers to meat packers, Filipino workers have been at the front lines of COVID – but have received little protection or recognition.

  • Magazine

    “Chip away at it”

    From March 2020 to March 2021 there were more than 21 hunger strikes in Canadian prisons. Briarpatch looks back on a year of prisoner rebellions during COVID and what they won.

  • Magazine

    Celebrating two magazine awards

    The Land Back issue’s National Magazine Award is a testament to the activists behind the Land Back movement, who have worked tirelessly to force the Canadian state and Canadian media to reckon with the literal and figurative foundations of this country.

  • Magazine

    Raising the floor

    Celebrating the 40th anniversary of CUPW’s 1981 strike, which won postal workers paid maternity leave, and raised the floor for maternal benefits throughout Canada.

  • Magazine

    The myth of Canadian generosity

    When Canada boasted about its foreign aid while repeatedly blocking a proposal to waive the intellectual property rights to the COVID vaccines, it revealed a 150-year-old pattern of empty generosity.

  • Magazine

    The ‘60s Scoop and everyday acts of elimination

    In her new book, Allyson Stevenson studies Saskatchewan’s child apprehension program at “the heart of Canada’s colonial enterprise.”

  • Magazine

    The House of Windsor must fall

    But not before they pay reparations to the descendants of the victims of the transatlantic trade in Africans.

  • Magazine

    The slow crisis in Saskatchewan’s long-term care

    Though 80 per cent of Canada’s COVID deaths have happened in long-term care homes, Saskatchewan has fared better than the Canadian average. It was thanks, in part, to its relatively robust system of publicly owned homes. But in recent decades, cracks have begun showing in that system.

  • Magazine

    The strike-breakers’ playbook

    For over 30 years, Canadian employers have turned to a private security firm called AFIMAC to help surveil picket lines, provide scab labour, and break strikes.

  • Magazine

    Ingesting surveillance

    A new digital pill that tracks whether it has been ingested is poised to enter the Canadian market. But for people who are incarcerated and medicated, it threatens to expand surveillance both inside and outside prisons.

  • Magazine

    What is a migrant? And is she a revolutionary?

    Migrants are now a central part of the local working class in virtually every town and city. Organizing against capitalism involves treating migrants not as objects of charity, but as revolutionary subjects.

  • Magazine

    Money rock

    Under the peatland and permafrost of northern Ontario lies some $60–$120 billion worth of copper, nickel, and chromite. The Ontario government is hell-bent on passing the Far North Act and mining the so-called Ring of Fire, but the Anishinaabayg have a sacred responsibility to protect the land, and with it, their language.

  • Magazine

    Facing loss honestly

    Defeat happens all the time in leftist campaigns, but very few leftists (including leftist media) have developed honest, helpful ways of talking about it.

  • Magazine

    Uncontainable

    How do we build a transformative mass movement against pandemic-era injustice?

  • Magazine

    Spirits

    Deeper than oceans, channels twice removed / from their native basins. This blood is thicker / than the St. Lawrence, quicker / than the Demerara, sicker / than the Ganges.

  • Magazine

    Finding kin and connection through “Halfbreed”

    This year, I read Maria Campbell’s foundational memoir in a book club of Métis women. Nearly 50 years since it was published, “Halfbreed” still holds important teachings for those of us on the journey of understanding what it means to be Métis.

  • Magazine

    Land Back beyond borders

    What does it mean for Indigenous people to be good guests on each other’s land?

  • Magazine

    China, the Canadian left, and countering state capitalist apologia

    Amid escalating tensions between the U.S. and Chinese governments, a troubling campist discourse has been growing in the Canadian left. Socialists should side with neither the American nor the Chinese state – instead, we need to build internationalism from below.