• Magazine

    The herbivore’s dilemma

    The Vegetarian Myth argues that strict vegetarianism is not the best diet for our health, for animals or for the planet. The stance is controversial in environmental and animal rights circles, but the subject matter is thoroughly explored, exhaustively researched and very persuasive. Keith is adamantly opposed to fast food and factory farming, but believes that strict vegetarianism isn’t the answer either, arguing instead for a sustainable food system based on mixed farming and a diet that includes moderate amounts of animal products.

  • Magazine

    Chow now

    Reading these three books was a humbling experience: Michael Pollan’s for his ability to bundle big ideas into digestible bites that would be easily remembered at the grocery store; Paul Roberts’ for his exacting detail about how nearly everything about the food system has gone so terribly wrong; and Wayne Roberts’ for the exciting thinking behind his policy suggestions on how to reorganize the food system.

  • Magazine

    Letter from the editor: a “curse of wealth” and a new leaf

    If Chicken Little had gotten her wings on Colonel Sanders’ business plan back in 1955, she would probably have felt the same way Saskatchewan environmentalists did when they read Fortune Magazine’s chops-licking article about their province last month.

  • Magazine

    Letter from the editor

    If Chicken Little had gotten her wings on Colonel Sanders’ business plan back in 1955, she would probably have felt the same way Saskatchewan environmentalists did when they read Fortune Magazine’s chops-licking article about their province last month.

  • Magazine

    Living behind the uranium curtain

    Saskatchewan is quickly joining Alberta in the continental corridor supplying oil and gas to the United States. This deepening integration with the resource-intensive U.S. economy, which leaves a toxic legacy on indigenous and Canadian lands, has its roots in a shift that began in the 1960s.

  • Magazine

    Saskatoon’s green party

    Intended to be a model that other mid-sized cities can adopt and adapt, We Are Many was a free, three-day festival held in Saskatoon’s Diefenbaker Park in August. Its aim was to combine education and arts to inspire individuals to make changes in their daily lives that, collectively, could represent a substantial step towards a more environmentally sustainable city.

  • Magazine

    Dirty deeds done dirt cheap

    High resource prices have expanded Saskatchewan’s economy above the national average, but have left the incomes of Saskatchewan people below the national average. A major challenge for the province is to translate its economic prosperity into higher living standards for provincial residents.

  • Magazine

    Wall’s war on the working class

    Organized labour, with a membership of around 100,000, or one in four workers, is relatively strong in Saskatchewan, thanks to modestly friendly labour laws put in place by NDP governments over the years. Saskatchewan has the fourth highest rate of unionization among Canada’s provinces, far ahead of Alberta and even slightly ahead of B.C. To right-wing ideologues and their business lobby bosses, this is not acceptable.

  • Magazine

    Disaster populism

    An interview with Naomi Klein about globalization, The Shock Doctrine and the global food crisis.

  • Magazine

    Full steam ahead

    Station 20 West is not just a model of an innovative community-based response to endemic poverty and the ill health that results from that poverty; it’s also an example of a community rallying around a good idea and bringing it to fruition, overcoming significant challenges in the process. Thanks to the overwhelming support of the community, the project is now back on track after nearly being derailed by the provincial government.

  • Magazine

    The Shipbuilder, Dog River and other roadside delights

    Along with the Roughriders and the “greatest Canadian,” Tommy Douglas, Saskatchewanians should also boast about their unique tourist gems which always take on a Saskatchewan flavour: intriguing, charming, unexpected.

  • Magazine

    Little footprint on the Prairie

    As Saskatchewan celebrates a period of economic growth and prosperity not seen since the first three decades of the 20th century, it does so at a precarious time for the planet.

  • Magazine

    A SLAPP in the face for free speech

    There’s something particularly disheartening when a media corporation abandons free speech principles. Journalists are supposed to be the good guys when it comes to freedom of expression, right? Shouldn’t media managers, of all people, support these principles?

  • Magazine

    Haiti and the Canadian labour movement

    Trade union activists in Canada have initiated a project to deepen ties of solidarity with the people of Haiti and popular Haitian organizations. The Haiti Union Solidarity Fund was launched in January of this year by union members in the Canada Haiti Action Network.

  • Magazine

    Northern exclusion

    Nunavut, “our land” in Inuktitut, was the result of more than 30 years of negotiations and planning by the Inuit of the Eastern and Central Arctic. So why are these original inhabitants, the overwhelming majority of people in the territory, not the principal beneficiaries of their land’s economic development?

  • Magazine

    Canada does Colombia

    Canada is very close to jumping into bed with one of the worst human rights violators in the hemisphere, and almost no one seems to have noticed.

  • Magazine

    Union organizing 2.0

    The shift in people’s media habits away from top-down broadcast media like television towards more interactive network media opens up interesting possibilities for grassroots democracy and political organizing. Labour unions are increasingly taking notice, and beginning to adapt the technologies to their own uses.

  • Magazine

    Adventures in coordinated bargaining

    There are no prepared documents. There’s no agenda. Your job, along with the other hundred front-line members of the Ontario University Workers Coordinating Committee (OUWCC), is to set priorities for the sector for the next three years, to tackle obstacles to that work, and to look for concrete ways to build the group’s capacity.

  • Magazine

    Too little too late?

    Canadian labour leaders and activists will need to be proactive and creative in the coming months and years if they hope to avoid the fate of those Oshawa auto workers.
  • Magazine

    Liliany Obando

    Liliany Obando was arrested — in front of her two children and elderly mother at their Bogota apartment — on August 8, 2008 by the Anti-Terrorism Unit of the Colombian National Police.