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  • Magazine

    Full steam ahead

    Station 20 West is not just a model of an innovative community-based response to endemic poverty and the ill health that results from that poverty; it’s also an example of a community rallying around a good idea and bringing it to fruition, overcoming significant challenges in the process. Thanks to the overwhelming support of the community, the project is now back on track after nearly being derailed by the provincial government.

  • Magazine

    The Shipbuilder, Dog River and other roadside delights

    Along with the Roughriders and the “greatest Canadian,” Tommy Douglas, Saskatchewanians should also boast about their unique tourist gems which always take on a Saskatchewan flavour: intriguing, charming, unexpected.

  • Magazine

    Little footprint on the Prairie

    As Saskatchewan celebrates a period of economic growth and prosperity not seen since the first three decades of the 20th century, it does so at a precarious time for the planet.

  • Magazine

    A SLAPP in the face for free speech

    There’s something particularly disheartening when a media corporation abandons free speech principles. Journalists are supposed to be the good guys when it comes to freedom of expression, right? Shouldn’t media managers, of all people, support these principles?

  • Magazine

    Haiti and the Canadian labour movement

    Trade union activists in Canada have initiated a project to deepen ties of solidarity with the people of Haiti and popular Haitian organizations. The Haiti Union Solidarity Fund was launched in January of this year by union members in the Canada Haiti Action Network.

  • Magazine

    Northern exclusion

    Nunavut, “our land” in Inuktitut, was the result of more than 30 years of negotiations and planning by the Inuit of the Eastern and Central Arctic. So why are these original inhabitants, the overwhelming majority of people in the territory, not the principal beneficiaries of their land’s economic development?

  • Magazine

    Canada does Colombia

    Canada is very close to jumping into bed with one of the worst human rights violators in the hemisphere, and almost no one seems to have noticed.

  • Magazine

    Union organizing 2.0

    The shift in people’s media habits away from top-down broadcast media like television towards more interactive network media opens up interesting possibilities for grassroots democracy and political organizing. Labour unions are increasingly taking notice, and beginning to adapt the technologies to their own uses.

  • Magazine

    Adventures in coordinated bargaining

    There are no prepared documents. There’s no agenda. Your job, along with the other hundred front-line members of the Ontario University Workers Coordinating Committee (OUWCC), is to set priorities for the sector for the next three years, to tackle obstacles to that work, and to look for concrete ways to build the group’s capacity.

  • Magazine

    Too little too late?

    Canadian labour leaders and activists will need to be proactive and creative in the coming months and years if they hope to avoid the fate of those Oshawa auto workers.
  • Magazine

    Liliany Obando

    Liliany Obando was arrested — in front of her two children and elderly mother at their Bogota apartment — on August 8, 2008 by the Anti-Terrorism Unit of the Colombian National Police.

  • Magazine

    The butterfly in the classroom

    At last fall’s University of Toronto conference on academic freedom, Freedom of Speech, Freedom to Teach, James Turk, executive director of the Canadian Association of University Teachers, offered some useful reminders about the intersection of schools with free expression.

  • Magazine

    Economics for everyone

    Book review of Jim Stanford’s Economics for everyone: A short guide to the economics of capitalism.

  • Magazine

    Letter from the editor

    A celebration of Briarpatch’s jade anniversary.

  • Magazine

    Peace begins at home

    The U.S. imperial project in Afghanistan has faltered. The government created by the United States lacks credibility and legitimacy. The vast majority of the people remain poor. The drug economy is dominant. Despite an increase in NATO military forces, the armed resistance led by the Taliban is increasing in strength. So what should Canada’s response be?

  • Magazine

    Mock justice

    An examination of the Omar Khadr case and why he should walk free.

  • Magazine

    Not wanted after the voyage

    It’s a Tuesday evening in Paris, and in the predominantly immigrant neighbourhood of Belleville, people from all corners of the world are crowding into the metro station. Tension is high tonight; for many, this ride home could be their last in France.

  • Magazine

    Damned if you do, damned if you don’t

    Once Hydro-Québec completes work, now started, to divert most of the kilometre-wide Rupert River into reservoirs along the Eastmain and La Grande River systems further north, the impact on the traditional hunting, fishing and trapping grounds—and on the culture they sustain—will be devastating. Seeking to stop the development, the province’s 16,000 Cree have tried tactics ranging from protest to legal action, but have had very little success so far in shaking the public utility’s addiction to mega projects.

  • Magazine

    Letter from the editor

    What happens when large numbers of people give up on the paradigm of “progress”—the idea that each generation will invariably live in greater material comfort and prosperity than the generation before?

  • Magazine

    “It’s tremendous fun to fight back”

    Derrick Jensen joined a Regina, Saskatchewan, audience via videoconference for a wide-ranging conversation. As usual, he challenged the audience to focus on protecting life rather than lifestyle, and urged them to recognize the breadth of the changes necessary to protect life on earth.