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    Unpacking the Coastal GasLink injunction and its omissions

    How one Canadian judge justified violent theft of Wet’suwet’en land

  • Magazine

    “This is not charity, this is solidarity”

    Resource Movement asks – earnestly – how can a group of rich kids help advance social justice movements?

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    Indigenous youth are rising up in solidarity with Wet’suwet’en

    They’ve been occupying the B.C. legislature for over 100 hours in support of the Wet’suwet’en Nation – and the youth movement has been spreading rapidly across Turtle Island.

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    Police protect corporations, not people

    From Wet’suwet’en to the Co-op refinery picket line, cops are acting as a central impediment to a liveable climate future

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    When a disease is racialized

    The coronavirus outbreak has sparked a rise in anti-Chinese racism. What are the historical roots of this response, and how might we confront it in Canada?

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    What’s wrong with “Milking prison labour”?

    Some clarifications about Briarpatch’s recent article about the reopening of the Kingston prison farms, and the work of Evolve Our Prison Farms.

  • Magazine

    A year in revolt

    Since September, a wave of protests has swept across the globe. Inequality and its violent maintenance is at the heart of the discontent.

  • Magazine

    The implicit militancy of gardening

    After two months on strike, CUPE 3903 members were feeling worn out. That changed when, one night – armed with a Rototiller, under cover of darkness – they decided to plant a community garden on the picket line.

  • Magazine

    A new era for Old Crow

    In the Yukon’s northernmost community, the Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation is reckoning with how to preserve their land and culture, amid a warming climate and an influx of tourists

  • Magazine

    Platforms for people, not profit

    Digital platforms boast that they’ve “democratized” cultural production. But getting to use something and having a meaningful say in its operation are two different things – and only one is really democratic. But what would truly democratic platforms and cultural production look like in Canada?

  • Magazine

    Organizing through loss in the heart of oil country

    The story of climate justice organizing in Alberta, at the heart of the tarsands, is the story of a group of young activists learning what it means to lose, and keep on fighting

  • Magazine

    Border poem

    On August 5, 2019, the Indian government issued a constitutional order stripping the disputed state of Jammu and Kashmir of its semi-autonomous status. These emails between two friends in Pakistan and Kashmir present the international crisis as it unfolds in real time through the eyes of two young women.

  • Magazine

    love as radical action

    What does it mean when “choosing love” isn’t an individual act, but a collective effort of building a world in which all of our material needs are met? estefania alfonso falcon reviews Kai Cheng Thom’s I Hope We Choose Love.

  • Magazine

    Transformation takes practice

    There’s no rulebook for transformative justice work. What we have and are being given are principles, beliefs, guidelines, and personal experiences. We must use these offerings iteratively, as tools to grapple with our own spaces and our positions within them.

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    Free transit is just the beginning

    It’s no coincidence that struggles over public transit are erupting across the Americas. Free transit is about an end to austerity, a refusal of police power, and a demand for decommodified and universal public services.

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    There’s no such thing as a politically neutral public space

    The #TakeBackTPL struggle to evict transphobia from our public library wasn’t about “free speech” – it was about reclaiming the commons

  • Magazine

    The climate case for working less

    The argument for a reduced work week asks: why do we work to produce so much more than we can possibly use? Why not work less, waste less, distribute better, and enjoy the age of abundance that we’ve been promised?

  • Magazine

    Striking for the common good

    Teachers bargaining for the common good contains the seed of radical change – and I mean “radical” in the same way that Angela Davis uses it, meaning “grasping at the root.”

  • Magazine

    The literal – and literary – futures we build

    Briarpatch editor Saima Desai talks to two judges of our Writing in the Margins contest about Idle No More and MMIWG, ethical kinship, writing queer sex, and their forthcoming work.

  • Magazine

    “At least hookers get wages”

    If sex were factored out of the equation, sugaring would look a lot like the precarious gig economy jobs of Uber drivers or bike couriers. And – like in other web-based jobs – sugar babies in Montreal are struggling to develop collective strength with their fellow workers.