• Magazine

    The Indian farmers’ protest is a window on a new world

    Since September 2020, tens of thousands of farmers and farm labourers and over 40 unions have been waging resistance to three agricultural farm bills in India. The protest’s sustained presence, immense scale, and diverse solidarities have shaken the legitimacy of Prime Minister Modi, and provided us all with a renewed ethical orientation and political vision for a new world.

  • Magazine

    Between swing and split

    Five Tamil artists in Toronto respond to “A Feller and The Tree,” a short film about the 26-year-long armed conflict in Sri Lanka and its fallout.

  • Magazine

    The co-option of mutual aid

    Mutual aid is rooted in Black and Indigenous resistance to state violence. We cannot allow white organizers, non-profits, and philanthropists to co-opt our teachings in a time of panic.

  • Magazine

    When security infects social work

    A Montreal homeless shelter recently laid off its front-line workers and replaced them with security guards. Service users and front-line workers in Montreal discuss what happens when social services focus on control, not care.

  • Magazine

    Sharing treaty land

    In rural Saskatchewan, a network of settler landholders and Indigenous people are finding a new way to share land.

  • Magazine

    “Built on a foundation of white supremacy”

    Coverage of Indigenous land defence reveals journalism’s symbiotic relationship with settler colonialism. Can we chart a path forward for decolonial and anti-colonial journalism?

  • Magazine

    Filipinos across Canada respond to pandemic inequalities

    From live-in caregivers to meat packers, Filipino workers have been at the front lines of COVID – but have received little protection or recognition.

  • Magazine

    “Chip away at it”

    From March 2020 to March 2021 there were more than 21 hunger strikes in Canadian prisons. Briarpatch looks back on a year of prisoner rebellions during COVID and what they won.

  • Magazine

    Celebrating two magazine awards

    The Land Back issue’s National Magazine Award is a testament to the activists behind the Land Back movement, who have worked tirelessly to force the Canadian state and Canadian media to reckon with the literal and figurative foundations of this country.

  • Magazine

    Raising the floor

    Celebrating the 40th anniversary of CUPW’s 1981 strike, which won postal workers paid maternity leave, and raised the floor for maternal benefits throughout Canada.

  • Magazine

    The myth of Canadian generosity

    When Canada boasted about its foreign aid while repeatedly blocking a proposal to waive the intellectual property rights to the COVID vaccines, it revealed a 150-year-old pattern of empty generosity.

  • Magazine

    The ‘60s Scoop and everyday acts of elimination

    In her new book, Allyson Stevenson studies Saskatchewan’s child apprehension program at “the heart of Canada’s colonial enterprise.”

  • Magazine

    The House of Windsor must fall

    But not before they pay reparations to the descendants of the victims of the transatlantic trade in Africans.

  • Magazine

    The slow crisis in Saskatchewan’s long-term care

    Though 80 per cent of Canada’s COVID deaths have happened in long-term care homes, Saskatchewan has fared better than the Canadian average. It was thanks, in part, to its relatively robust system of publicly owned homes. But in recent decades, cracks have begun showing in that system.

  • Magazine

    The strike-breakers’ playbook

    For over 30 years, Canadian employers have turned to a private security firm called AFIMAC to help surveil picket lines, provide scab labour, and break strikes.

  • Magazine

    Ingesting surveillance

    A new digital pill that tracks whether it has been ingested is poised to enter the Canadian market. But for people who are incarcerated and medicated, it threatens to expand surveillance both inside and outside prisons.

  • Magazine

    What is a migrant? And is she a revolutionary?

    Migrants are now a central part of the local working class in virtually every town and city. Organizing against capitalism involves treating migrants not as objects of charity, but as revolutionary subjects.

  • Magazine

    Money rock

    Under the peatland and permafrost of northern Ontario lies some $60–$120 billion worth of copper, nickel, and chromite. The Ontario government is hell-bent on passing the Far North Act and mining the so-called Ring of Fire, but the Anishinaabayg have a sacred responsibility to protect the land, and with it, their language.

  • Magazine

    Facing loss honestly

    Defeat happens all the time in leftist campaigns, but very few leftists (including leftist media) have developed honest, helpful ways of talking about it.

  • Online-only

    Against all nationalisms

    Nandita Sharma responds to Phil Henderson’s review of her new book, “Home Rule.” She argues that instead of providing us with freedom and justice, national liberation struggles have delivered us to capital and to sovereign power. As a result, rejecting nationalism – all nationalisms, including indigenous nationalisms “from below” – is critical to anti-colonial struggle.