• Magazine

    The battle for Heron Gate

    Mega-landlord Timbercreek owns half of one of the poorest and most racialized neighbourhoods in Ottawa – and they’re evicting over 400 residents to build a new “resort-style apartment” complex. But tenants are organizing from the grassroots and fighting to save Heron Gate.

  • Magazine

    A pipeline to regret

    If you weren’t convinced before – simply by being an air-breathing, water-drinking human being – it’s now undeniable that we all have skin in this pipeline game. Trudeau has made us all potential shareholders in a leaky, aging piece of climate-cooking infrastructure.

  • Magazine

    Distinct histories, shared solidarity

    Black and Indigenous people cannot look to the state for protection or systemic change. Instead, our movements have to recognize the differences between our oppressions, and stand beside each other while building new, shared spaces to exist.

  • Magazine

    The dangerous illusion of the humane prison

    The right of trans prisoners in Canada to self-identify their gender is an important win. How can it be used to fuel – and not drain – our efforts towards a future without prisons?

  • Magazine

    Process of depression

    In 2016, Nicholas Dinardo was arrested and sent to remand at the Regina Correctional Centre. After remaining in segregation for most of the last year, he wrote this poem.

  • Magazine

    “We don’t need permission to be free”

    The Zapatistas have always been on the frontlines of the opposition to NAFTA. In March, thousands of women Zapatistas and activists gathered in Chiapas to share their struggles and victories in building a world beyond capitalism.

  • Magazine

    The fight for food sovereignty on P.E.I.

    Big agribusiness corporations control the entire food supply chain – from seed to superstore – on Prince Edward Island. But small family farms are fighting back.

  • Magazine

    Should unions say no to closed-door negotiations?

    Unions in Canada and the U.S. are throwing open the doors to collective bargaining meetings, hoping to win stronger contracts and more engaged members. Will it work?

  • Magazine

    Start-up nation, apartheid state

    Israeli R&D companies and their Canadian collaborators that appear to work toward clean energy or life-saving medical technologies are part of an economic infrastructure that both extends the physical occupation of Palestine and normalizes the inevitability of the Israeli state.

  • Magazine

    We Interrupt This Program

    A new book explores Indigenous interventions into settler media, combining acceptance with refusal. Greg Macdougall reviews We Interrupt This Program by Miranda Brady and John Kelly.

  • Magazine

    Against performative sharing

    If you’re gonna plaster my newsfeed with photos of dead Indigenous youth, you better show up to the vigil.

  • Magazine

    Anything but empty

    Terra nullius is a lie. The Prairies have never been empty – they’ve always been teeming with anti-capitalist and anti-colonial resistance.

  • Magazine

    Chilling public protest

    Strategic Lawsuits Against Public Participation (SLAPPs) are used to silence, impoverish, and intimidate protesters. Now, with a lawsuit filed against the alleged participants of Winnipeg’s Rooster Town Blockade, we may be seeing one of the first SLAPPs on the Prairies.

  • Magazine

    Remembering the 1919 Drumheller strike

    “Hell’s Hole,” “the Devil’s Row,” and “the Western Front” – these were the nicknames for the coal mines of the Drumheller valley. In 1919, around 6,500 Drumheller coal miners walked off the job after voting to join the radical and militant One Big Union. Nearly a hundred years later, the 1919 Drumheller strike remains one of the most famous examples of workers’ power on the Prairies.

  • Magazine

    Socializing and decolonizing Saskatchewan’s oil

    Could a new crown corporation – SaskOil – allow us to wind down the industry, get off oil, keep people employed, and repatriate land, resources, and decision-making to Indigenous peoples?

  • Magazine

    Uprooted

    Through the ’60s, ’70s, and ’80s, the Canadian government took thousands of First Nations children from their families and placed them in white foster homes. I was one of them. Alienated from my language, culture, and community, I was taught to hate my people.

  • Magazine

    Farmer Fightback

    Amid neoliberal government policies, rampant climate change, and corporate land grabbing, the National Farmers Union continues to fight for sustainability, income security, and farmers’ dignity.

  • Magazine

    Fighting for Space

    The history of the harm reduction movement is one of direct action and protest – an “act first, ask second” attitude that was the only reasonable response to an outbreak of preventable disease and a crisis of premature deaths. Nicholas Olson reviews Fighting for Space, by Travis Lupick.

  • Magazine

    Oil’s Deep State

    The fossil fuel industry has the Canadian government by the throat – but it’s been a long time coming. Joseph Laforest reviews Oil’s Deep State, by Kevin Taft.

  • Magazine

    Where is the left on the Canadian Prairies?

    Years with so little social struggle on the Prairies have left us without much of what Alan Sears calls the “infrastructure of dissent.”