• Magazine

    Gabor Maté: On Storytelling, Health, and the Ruling Class

    Part two of Ryan Meili’s conversation with Gabor Maté.

  • Magazine

    Gabor Maté: How Capitalism Makes Us Sick

    Two physicians discuss the political economy of human well-being.

  • Blog

    Anti-fascist fitness?

    The fitness industry and the obesity panic are two sides of the same coin, both signs of a serious contempt for the body – at least in its natural state.

  • Magazine

    Down in a Hole

    This is the kind of place where Ashley Smith died in 2007. It is also the kind of place where Julie Bilotta gave birth on a cement floor last year.

  • Magazine

    When a bone breaks

    “It’s going to be very painful without the anaesthetic in your toe.” My face twists in anticipation. “Maybe we could give you something to relax a little, send you off to sleep.”

  • Magazine

    From abortion rights to reproductive justice

    It’s been nearly 25 years since the Supreme Court decrim­inalized abortion in Canada, but the dust has yet to settle on Parliament Hill.

  • Magazine

    Sing, Brother

    I reached Edmonton’s High Level Bridge as clusters of snowflakes clouded the sky. It was Friday night, already dark, and I was alone but for a young man in black who passed me from the opposite ledge.

  • Magazine

    Boiling point

    The lack of safe drinking water in First Nations communities is just one example of the long-standing underfunding and neglect that has led to the substandard living conditions that plague First Nations communities across Canada.

  • Magazine

    Toward sexual self-determination

    What You Really Really Want is a powerful tool for radically transforming how we understand and navigate the complexities of our own sexuality.

  • Magazine

    But we do it anyway

    I opened my eyes to find the doctor staring at me. I had been dreaming of dragonflies, filling the brightening sky and stretching their wings in the early morning sun.

  • Magazine

    Awaiting justice

    For three decades, the traditional territory of the Lubicon Cree in northern Alberta has undergone massive oil and gas development without the consent of the Lubicon people and without recognition of our Aboriginal rights.

  • Magazine

    Same fight, new foes

    In the summer of 1962, Saskatchewan was beset by a doctors’ strike intent on preserving physician privileges and opposing public health care. Fifty years later, Canada’s medicare system is again under threat.

  • Magazine

    Crisis in care

    As the pioneer of privatized care in Canada, Ontario has opened the doors for a corporate takeover of long-term care homes, resulting in chronic understaffing by profit-seeking multinational providers.

  • Magazine

    Food for all!

    In 2009, immigration enforcement entered a community garden outside a Toronto food bank and deported one of its users. The deportation was but one of the 70-odd sweeps, detentions and deportations that happen in Toronto every single day and underscored one of the barriers to food access for undocumented migrants in this country.

  • Magazine

    From apple pie and mother’s milk to pop-tarts and formula

    Ninety per cent of pregnant families in Canada plan to breastfeed their children. After the recommended six months later, less than 25 per cent of those families are still exclusively breastfeeding. This is a story of severed cultural ties to breastfeeding knowledge; “breast is best” lip service by many care providers, hospitals and government funding models; and huge marketing dollars from the big multinationals that produce artificial human milk (marketed as the more genteel “formula”).

  • Magazine

    Safer sex work

    “In my view the law plays a sufficient contributory role in preventing a prostitute from taking steps that could reduce the risk of such violence.” With these concluding remarks by Justice Susan Himel, the laws that kept sex work illegal in Ontario were struck down in November 2010. The ruling, however, has been stayed, pending an appeal by the federal government that’s scheduled to begin in June, 2011.

  • Magazine

    Witch hunts past and present

    In the classic zine Witches, Midwives & Nurses: A History of Women Healers, republished as a book with a new introduction in 2010, authors Deirdre English and Barbara Ehrenreich provide an overview of the repression and exclusion of women lay healers in Europe and the United States. The authors explore the connection between the witch hunts in Europe and attempts to eliminate and discredit women healers, as well as the rise of an elitist and male-dominated medical establishment in the United States.

  • Magazine

    Letter from the editor

    Health, and the way we manage our collective well-being, is inherently political. As perhaps the most universally relevant topic, health care cuts across lines of class, race, nationality, age, gender and political bent, and has the potential to either unite or polarize, to inspire or enrage. As well as being highly political, health care is also deeply personal, affecting each of us at the most fundamental level of our existence.

  • Magazine

    In defense of universal health care

    There’s nothing universal about an insurance-based system, and Canadians concerned about the future of medicare would do well to understand the problems inherent in the American system.

  • Magazine

    Breeding disease

    Many Canadians first learned of flesh-eating disease or necrotizing fasciitis in 1994 when then-Bloc Québécois leader Lucien Bouchard lost his leg, and very nearly his life, to the affliction. Media reports of Bouchard’s brush with death described the disease as “extremely rare.” It was at the time, but has since become more commonplace.