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Mary Jane Logan McCallum is an associate professor in the history department at the University of Winnipeg. She studies and teaches modern Indigenous history and Indigenous–state relations in ways that reflect on the distinct nature of colonialism in Canadian history. Her current project examines Indigenous histories of tuberculosis, 1930–1970.

  • Magazine

    The Indigenous Nurses Who Decolonized Health Care

    Few Indigenous labour history studies, especially in the post-fur trade era, focus on Indigenous women’s work, but labour functioned as a colonial tool to strip Indigenous people of title and status. Indigenous women faced the worst moral and social regulation, racism, and sexism at work, and so Indigenous women’s labour became a site of resistance to patriarchy, colonialism, and capitalism. The history of Indigenous nurses’ organizing was especially revolutionary.