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D’Arcy Hande, a retired archivist and historian, has keenly followed the uranium industry’s activity in Saskatchewan since the Saskatchewan Party government launched the Uranium Development Partnership in 2008. A long-time opponent of the promotion of nuclear power as sustainable energy, he paid close attention to the negotiation of the collaboration agreement between Cameco and Areva and the Village of Pinehouse, and interviewed many of the agreement’s foremost opponents in Pinehouse. In June 2013, he joined 38 other plaintiffs in challenging the agreement at the Saskatchewan Court of Queen’s Bench.

  • Magazine

    Pinehouse Business North: Missing records, missing accountability

    Where are Pinehouse Business North’s records from 2009 and 2011? Saskatchewan’s Freedom of Information Act can’t help answer questions of accountability.

  • Magazine

    The Pinehouse Collaboration Agreement with Uranium Firms

    FOI requests reveal a disturbing lack of documentation, accountability, and transparency in the collaboration agreement between the Northern Village of Pinehouse and uranium mining firms Cameco and Areva.

  • Magazine

    How the Nuclear Waste Management Organization targeted Pinehouse

    When nuclear waste comes calling.

  • Magazine

    Courting collaboration

    Pinehouse residents Fred Pederson, John Smerek, and Dale Smith all feel like they have been wearing targets on their backs since their names appeared in a lawsuit filed in June.

  • Magazine

    A chronology of collusion

    On October 14, 2011, the University of Saskatchewan board of governors formally approved the incorporation of the Canadian Centre for Nuclear Innovation (CCNI) “to stimulate new research, development and training in advanced aspects of nuclear science and technology.” Although the pieces seemed to come together in just a few short months, the game plan had been coalescing since Brad Wall’s Saskatchewan Party government was first elected in 2007.

  • Magazine

    Follow the yellowcake road

    On October 14, 2011, the University of Saskatchewan board of governors formally approved the incorporation of the Canadian Centre for Nuclear Innovation (CCNI) “to stimulate new research, development and training in advanced aspects of nuclear science and technology.” Tracing corporate connections and developments behind the scenes shows how a coordinated strategy can be implemented largely outside public purview and beyond generally accepted public accountability.